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Repairing FHP TENV Leeson Motor

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jpanhalt

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I have a TENV fractional HP (1/6 HP, 3.2 FLA at 115VAC) Leeson motor on a septic aerator. The bearings froze and are shot after just 2 years. The armature has a plastic internal fan that makes removal of the armature and replacement of the end bearing difficult. There is no external capacitor. The fan can probably be removed with a little heat, but I am worried about getting it reattached well. I would use Loctite if I get to that point.

Question: Is the fan really necessary?

John
 

Les Jones

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I think the fan is necessary. (The manufacturer would have saved the cost of the fan if it was not required.) You may be able to remove the bearing using a seperator tool like this one.
I had to make one a few days ago to remove a bearing on a Dewalt chop saw. This is a link that shows this type of tool being used on this type of chop saw.

Les.
 

jpanhalt

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Problem was solved with a little more persistence and effort. Got the fan off without heat or damaging it. Will re-install with a little Loctite. My concern was that if the fan were damaged, it is not something I could buy retail.

I am in urgent need to get the aerator fixed as my daughter and her family are visiting in a little more than a week.

John
 

MaxHeadRoom78

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Is it sintered bronze or roller bearing?
If sintered bronze and not overly worn it can be cleaned off and soaking in light oil for a while.
Max.
 

jpanhalt

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It is/was ball bearing. Even the shields are distorted. Here is what they look like upside down:
upload_2017-3-27_17-41-46.png

The long shaft is hollow and submerged. Air is aspirated into the sewage. The motor rests in a riser off a holding tank.

For mine, the motor is enclosed on a larger bell housing. It is no longer made, and technically (EPA sort of thing) , I can repair with the same thing, but substitution of a functionally identical unit, e.g., one without the bell housing, would require recertification if my system, since the system and aerator were sold as a unit. Fortunately, that law is rarely enforced on home owners; however, it is a risk should there be a problem.

John
 

jpanhalt

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It is a common 6203 (metric) bearing. Picking up two SS, rubber-sealed ones tomorrow. Cleveland has a very large bearing warehouse on the West (my side) of town.

John
 
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