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Thanks for having me!

Thread starter #1
My name is scott. Im a Journeymen transmission lineman. I stumbled onto the raspberry pi online about a year ago looking for a diy smart home system. I bought one, and a microcontrol car kit. That's what opened the door for me into your world.
I am done building my new home and now ready to start my smart home features. I have no one to talk to in my circle of friends about this, I'm hoping to meet some here. Thanks again.
 

JimB

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
#3
Welcome to ETO.

Was a required field so I chose microcontroller . I'm Certainly no expert
Don't worry about it!
It is not a problem.

JimB
 

Pommie

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
#4
Welcome. I think you'll find lots of knowledgeable people here.

Mike.
Edit, typo
 
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cowboybob

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
#5
500,000 VAC is slightly above the normal operating voltages ordinarily discussed here :woot:. But I've seen the videos of you guys crawling from the helo to the cables and then shooching along the line. That takes more nads than I've got...

Lotsa expertise here with the μcontrollers (and a lot of other stuff as well ).
 

large_ghostman

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
#6
Probably better to leave the pi at home when going to work though ;), so now we got someone who is gona look at our dire warnings of MOT's and scoff lol, HA i take your MOT and raise you a power station.....

Cant compete with that, cant even bring out the neon sign transformer, we are done, finished, beaten. :D

Welcome to the site, alot of us here into automation and smart systems. Myself i like mesh networks but general home automation is also a fascination, do you have the pi2 or 3?

AND seeing as everyone is thinking it and no one wants to say it......are you from witchita by any chance?
 
Thread starter #7
Probably better to leave the pi at home when going to work though ;), so now we got someone who is gona look at our dire warnings of MOT's and scoff lol, HA i take your MOT and raise you a power station.....

Cant compete with that, cant even bring out the neon sign transformer, we are done, finished, beaten. :D

Welcome to the site, alot of us here into automation and smart systems. Myself i like mesh networks but general home automation is also a fascination, do you have the pi2 or 3?

AND seeing as everyone is thinking it and no one wants to say it......are you from witchita by any chance?

Ha! No, I'm from West Virginia. nor do I work for the county.
I started with the pi3. I have a 2 I bought in a lot, but I've never opened it. I just bought another 3. I want to make a old school arcade game for my 8 yr old. We read "ready player 1"(great read btw) and now we're going old school. My Fascination is with the arduino, all the sensors, and programming. Let's call it learning to program. I'm still working on making the led blink one sec on,one sec off. But it's progress!
I have basic electricity down. But boy what a new world this is!
 
Thread starter #8
500,000 VAC is slightly above the normal operating voltages ordinarily discussed here :woot:. But I've seen the videos of you guys crawling from the helo to the cables and then shooching along the line. That takes more nads than I've got...

Lotsa expertise here with the μcontrollers (and a lot of other stuff as well ).
Thanks a lot. I've been reading some post. Great info.
We contract out the helo. We have to climb and most of the time it's deenergized .
 
Thread starter #10
Ha! No, I'm from West Virginia. nor do I work for the county.
I started with the pi3. I have a 2 I bought in a lot, but I've never opened it. I just bought another 3. I want to make a old school arcade game for my 8 yr old. We read "ready player 1"(great read btw) and now we're going old school. My Fascination is with the arduino, all the sensors, and programming. Let's call it learning to program. I'm still working on making the led blink one sec on,one sec off. But it's progress!
I have basic electricity down. But boy what a new world this is!
And,I'll be looking into mesh systems, thanks
 

ronsimpson

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
#12
I am done building my new home and now ready to start my smart home features.
You can start a thread about smart home. I am working on home automation. Today I tried to get the Pi working with a 500G hard drive. (got it formatted and mounted but did not install the operating system)

I also have 16 relays ready to try. (using I2C)
 

large_ghostman

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
#13
I have basic electricity down
:confused:Thats a comfort

I'm still working on making the led blink one sec on,one sec off. But it's progress!
Make a led blink in as many ways as you can come up with, master each way one at a time, so basic loops, then more complicated loops then 2 leds then maybe add a potentiometer to alter the time of flash, then eventually interrupts and on a button press, then do it viars232.

Thats will take you 3/4 of the way to anything you can do on a micro ;), flashing leds is the best way to learn, its a good visual indicator and you can slowly add complexity to how you do it.

In reality that way your learning every aspect of the micro in a way it will stick. or simply cut N paste code from the net and learn nothing
 
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KeepItSimpleStupid

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
#14
Ahh. 500 kV is 500 kV with respect to ground. Respect to itself is zero, so what's the problem?

The highest voltage I played with was 100 kV at 0.1A. The highest power was 15 kV at 1.5 Amps. Highest RF(10.6 MHz) was 1000 W into 50 ohms.
Lowest measured current was around 2 pA at around 100 V. Highest current was 3000 A at 6.3 V.

Wierdest instrument I built was a 4-terminal I-V converter, biasable +-10V, 4 ranges from +-100 mA (+-10V out) in 4 ranges 100, 10, 1 and 0.1 mA FS.
Suppression was +-50 mA if the bias was limited to +-5V. Unnullable DC offset was 40 pA. No nulling provision provided. It was supposed to have it.
Voltage offset was a few mV. It was a front end to a DSP Lock-in amplifier.

The oddest component I ever replaced was a 10 meg-ohm 200 Watt resistor. It was the bleeder for the 15 kV supply.
 

Cicero

Active Member
#15
Welcome!

If you're trying to get into cheap diy home automation also look into the ESP8266, very cheap and accessible wifi module. Look into Sonoff's as well (they also have internal ESP8266's by the way)

It has an absolutely fantastic Arduino community, and very likely someone there has done exactly what you're looking for ;)
 
Thread starter #16
:confused:Thats a comfort



Make a led blink in as many ways as you can come up with, master each way one at a time, so basic loops, then more complicated loops then 2 leds then maybe add a potentiometer to alter the time of flash, then eventually interrupts and on a button press, then do it viars232.

Thats will take you 3/4 of the way to anything you can do on a micro ;), flashing leds is the best way to learn, its a good visual indicator and you can slowly add complexity to how you do it.

In reality that way your learning every aspect of the micro in a way it will stick. or simply cut N paste code from the net and learn nothing
That's what I came here looking for! Starting to move a little faster. Just learning the lingo
My name is scott. Im a Journeymen transmission lineman. I stumbled onto the raspberry pi online about a year ago looking for a diy smart home system. I bought o?klko l mommyhole vu kook kkne,o lo oo[oool llk m mmm and a microcontrol car kit. That's what openoooed the door for me into your world.
Km
Welcome!

If you're trying to get into cheap diy home automation also look into the ESP8266, very cheap and accessible wifi module. Look into Sonoff's as well (they also have internal ESP8266's by the way)

It has an absolutely fantastic Arduino community, and very likely someone there has done exactly what you're looking for ;)
Thanks. Will look into it for sure. Right now my problem is I want to do more than I'm capable of. I keep seeing these great ideas, and the owners of these ideas are explaining them in a foreign toung. I have to decipher what their saying before I can study what they are doing. But, it's been fun. Thanks
 
Thread starter #17
You can start a thread about smart home. I am working on home automation. Today I tried to get the Pi working with a 500G hard drive. (got it formatted and mounted but did not install the operating system)

I also have 16 relays ready to try. (using I2C)
After I got the os on sd card I can open it on any monitor. I have tried a dozen times to open it on my laptop,no luck.
 

KeepItSimpleStupid

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
#18
After I got the os on sd card I can open it on any monitor. I have tried a dozen times to open it on my laptop,no luck.
Not a PI user, but a Linux user.

1st, you might try setting up ssh which would give you command line access. With windows you would need an application like Putty. If some username is defined on the PI with an optional password, from the command line you can ssh into the PI from the PI.

If you get:

ubuntu@ubuntu:~$ ssh ubuntu@localhost
ssh: connect to host localhost port 22: Connection refused
ubuntu@ubuntu:~$

In this case ubuntu is the username. If you get that, the ssh server isn't running. localhost is always 127.0.0.1 which is the loopback address. On the PC with Putty. you have to replace localhost with the IP address of the PI.

Eventually, you can set things up such that you don;t need a password to connect. scp is secure copy which uses ssh to copy files. Setting up an ssh server on the PC might be a little harder. With that you can copy files from either side. It can be set up so a password is not required. The machines have a "certificate" that allows them to connect.

==

VNC allows GUI (graphic user interface access). See https://www.raspberrypi.org/magpi/vnc-raspberry-pi/

If you don't assign a static IP address to your Laptop or PI, it may change. In your router, you get to define which addresses are fixed and which ones are given out by DHCP. Printers, for instance, should have a static address. You might want to assign a long lease time for DHCP addresses, so laptops, phones and other devices have a good change of getting the same IP address each time they connect to the network.

Aside: If you can connect to the Internet, the the tcp/ip stack is working. "ping localhost" is another way to check. Connectivity between the PC and the PI and vice versa can be checked with ping as well. e.g. ping 192.168.1.10. The PI from the PC and the PC from the PI.

In order for certain protocals to function, the specific ports have to be open.
 
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Mickster

Well-Known Member
#20
I meant that, IMO, if he's got the smarts (or the crazies :p) to work on 500KV, I doubt he would be satisfied with simply taking the easy way out with a laptop and USB joystick.
That's kinda like this:
Mac.jpg
;)
 

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