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[Stupid Question] Hard drive port detached with motherboard connectors, need help fixing it.

Thread starter #1
Hello,

First of all, I'm totally inexperienced, and just someone trying to salvage a device if it's doable.

I was trying to disconnect the HDD cable out of its port, but the whole thing came off with the connectors still soldered to it. I got some advice telling me it's an easy fix but I'm not sure where to go from here. Apparently it's much easier to reconnect the wires directly instead of fixing the port.

This is the port, cable and the connections:


Apparently I would need to remove the port cap at the end of the cable wires, and solder them on the traces of the motherboard in the according order, then bridge the gap for the two middle sections. How should I go about this?

should I just directly solder on the red traces or the pcb directly where the connectors came off? picture:


Thank you for any help given.
 

large_ghostman

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
#2
Whoever said easy lied to you.

Do you have a soldering iron?

There are a couple of ways, but i am going to think first if its even worth trying to get the plug back on, or doing it a different way.
 
Thread starter #3
Yes I do have the materials, also have flux if that's necessary. I have at least some small experience with soldering, not pro of course, it just won't be a first time.

as for the port, if there's an easier way without it, that's fine with me.
 

Externet

Active Member
#4
Should be simple. Find someone that knows how to solder if you do not feel like.
Do not visit a computer repair place; they do not know what a soldering iron is.
Yes, wires can be soldered directly to their corresponding traces without the connector.
Last, buy a same model used hard drive and swap the boards.
 

large_ghostman

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
#5
Should be simple. Find someone that knows how to solder if you do not feel like.
Do not visit a computer repair place; they do not know what a soldering iron is.
Yes, wires can be soldered directly to their corresponding traces without the connector.
Last, buy a same model used hard drive and swap the boards.
He has to solder the connector lugs as well, he will also need to remove the green coating etc all without damage. Sorry but to me thats not a lv1 repair by any stretch. Yes it can be done, yes i could strip the coating off and do it for you, but we are talking about you trying it and no offense but its not where you would start a beginner.

Whatever happens the coating has to come off, the lugs need resoldering and it wont match up exactly so you might need to solder some connector wires for a good connection.

Still wondering about making it easier and getting you to ditch the plug.

Those connector have a barb, it came off because you pulled it off, or the connector pads to the board had gone. Do you have a fibre cleaning pen? if its not electronics solder flux dont use it, plumbers stuff is bad new and acidic
 

large_ghostman

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
#6
It wont read his disk with a new board.
 
Thread starter #7
Thank you for your help again.

Whatever happens the coating has to come off
Really? can't I just link the two mid sections with a conductive bridge or something? (which is what was said to me)

No cleaning pen, and flux seems to be for electronics (MG chemicals brand)

just in case it might help, here's some better pics:
 

large_ghostman

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
#8
can you take a pick with the connector in place please (as it would go on the board, ) on the plug are those silver areas solder? its hard to tell on my screen. You might be in with a chance. But you tackle the solder pads first that hold the socket, the reason is so you make sure they are stuck on solid and aligned, you can keep resoldering those, once they sorted and its lined up then you might get a shot.

But need a decent pick with the socket as it would go on the board. I didnt realize you had bare solder showing on the socket parts.

That last pic i am more hopeful, but seriously unless your experienced prepare for a ball ache :D, be ready to keep trying and walk away when annoyed. PADS FIRST that hold the socket!!! They matter the most and decide if you succeed, also great practice for the tracks :D.

Is it liquid or paste solder? if its paste forget it, normal lead solder has flux in, dont buy the green lead free stuff, this post will run longer than a mr debs post if you use lead free solder!
 
Thread starter #9
Here is the connector in place, contact (not precisely) and separated:

And here is a better view of the port/plug, the pins are basically still perfectly soldered to the green layer, the pins and solders are intact, but the layer broke off:



And this is the Flux and solder, flux is in syringe, solder is leaded I think, and yeah, this is going to be long...



This is just a win-win for me, if I can't do it well I'll at least gain some type of experience, if I can i'll get experience and the damn thing fixed!
 

large_ghostman

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
#10
Now can you see why the coating has to come off? do it real careful, but yes do able, if your careful, the scrunched up foil at the back will be a PITA.

I got a bad morning (having dof put down) when i get back i will post detailed instructions, wait for some one else to agree or not then proceed or not:D
 

Mickster

Well-Known Member
#11
The pics in post #7 are very clear and it appears to be an easy fix, since there is an outline of where the traces were on the PCB originally.
This header is the power connector for the HDD. It needs +12V, +5V and ground.
The two center traces appear to be ground, as they are used for anchoring the connector and also seem to be stitched with vias.
Please confirm this with a meter on Ohms.
There should be continuity between both sets of stitching vias (8 at the top and 6 at the middle in the post #7 pic)
It's probably best to restore the broken ground connections by soldering in a new wire from the top section, where the 8 vias are, to the middle section where the 6 vias are.
This will reduce the possibility of high resistance/low current on the ground for the HDD supply.
You can snip the wires from the connector, one-by-one, and solder them in the corresponding order to the PCB, at the bare copper points in your pic (highlighted in the red rectangle) I would mate up the wires with the broken header, to make sure you have the orientation correct, then start from left-to-right (assuming you are right-handed)
3EHuRsf.jpg
 

large_ghostman

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
#12
Mick you spotted something i didnt!

I got some old drives, what drive is this? I was looking at the traces and the vias, he wants the connector resolderd. BUT as i said a few posts back i think soldering the wires directly is the way to go, i think thats is what your saying as well?

I missed the ground plane completely! Sorry OP my bad and a stupid mistake, this is why i said wait for confirmation :D. Mick could well have saved your skin, direct wire soldering if possible is the way to go and yes easy lv1 stuff.

Mick nice one mate, i could blame my screen but honestly i missed the ground plane and focused on the via connectors and the traces i didnt even look at the ground, i need more soldering iron time and less other things time lol, getting sloppy in my old age
 
#13
Looks like the others have beat me to it.

I say it's an easy fix.


Here's how it would have looked before the damage ...

1.jpg


I would clean off the paint coating and widen the outer pads that Mickster mentioned above ... then tin them ...


2.jpg


Then solder the wires direct ...


3.jpg

Good luck
 
#14
Should be simple. Find someone that knows how to solder if you do not feel like.
Do not visit a computer repair place; they do not know what a soldering iron is.
Great point.

I often have people turn up at my workshop with these sorts of issues.

If they've done the preparation ... and I just have to solder it for them ... it's literally a 60 second job and I don't even charge them. Often they'll still insist on handing over a few bucks ... so it's a win - win.

What makes me smile is when they say they would have done it themselves, but they ... couldn't find their soldering iron ... or ... insert any stupid reason you can think of !!! :)
 

Mickster

Well-Known Member
#15
For those of us who have been doing this stuff for years, it's an easy fix.
However, we don't know OP's experience and comfort zone.
Instead of having OP scrape away conformal coating and solder mask, there are easily-accessible pads, just waiting to soak up some solder, in the exact same order as the wires were fitted into the wiring to the header.
 
Thread starter #16
Wow, I really appreciate all the help, I feel like a passerby having to operate on a dying man by following surgeon instructions by phone. I'm exaggerating, but I'm excited.

However, we don't know OP's experience and comfort zone.
Nice of you to have some perspective, I'm in the art field, so basically at the complete opposite side of the world, yet I really want to learn more now.

Before I do something stupid though, i'll get a night of sleep, it was a long day. thanks again for bearing with me. I'll be back.
 

Mickster

Well-Known Member
#17
What makes me smile is when they say they would have done it themselves, but they ... couldn't find their soldering iron ... or ... insert any stupid reason you can think of !!! :)
What gets my goat is when they try to tell you what needs to be done. Like a Google search trumps your experience and you haven't got a clue what you are doing.
If I were in a position where I did not need their business, I would issue a challenge to them - "Here's all of my equipment, you are free to use whatever you need to do the job. If you can complete the job in a timely manner, you get it for free. If I have to step in and complete the repair myself, I charge you double. Would you like me take the job, or do you think you need to go somewhere else?"
 

large_ghostman

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
#18
Wow, I really appreciate all the help, I feel like a passerby having to operate on a dying man by following surgeon instructions by phone. I'm exaggerating, but I'm excited.


Nice of you to have some perspective, I'm in the art field, so basically at the complete opposite side of the world, yet I really want to learn more now.

Before I do something stupid though, i'll get a night of sleep, it was a long day. thanks again for bearing with me. I'll be back.
welcome to the site, sorry i got it wrong this time. I didnt think you could do it yourself, but i missed a couple of very obvious points the others picked up on. No excuses i got it wrong.

I wish you well, but try not to get hooked on this game, it aint a way to keep a healthy bank balance :D, well not at the start it isnt lol
 
Thread starter #19
welcome to the site, sorry i got it wrong this time.
Don't be, you were the first to help and give the thread some traction, and I got plenty of advice from you as well.


Alright, so I did a model of how I can do it with my available tool right now, and if I'm getting this right, this is how it should look, correct?

 

unclejed613

Well-Known Member
#20
yes, that's correct, you do have those exposed pads available, and those are easier to solder to than it would be to try and scrape the solder mask (green enamel) off the traces.


Thank you for your help again.


Really? can't I just link the two mid sections with a conductive bridge or something? (which is what was said to me)

No cleaning pen, and flux seems to be for electronics (MG chemicals brand)

just in case it might help, here's some better pics:
 

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