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Salvaging an older Fischer Stereo

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sircharlton

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I'm Kody, a new electronics hobbyist (complete random urge to become one) and found a Fischer Stereo on the side of the road. This is my second post relating to a topic like this, but can anyone tell me if it's worth selling or salvaging, and what quality parts I might find?

P.S.
My knowledge on electrical engineering is pathetic but I'm in the process of gathering tools, parts, supplies to experiment with, which is why I ask these questions.


One more question? Taking apart electeonele, a.e. an old crt tv, I find copper wire wound around a dark rock like material that isn't magnetic. I believe it's the flux but does anyone know what this rock like material is? I say rock because it cracks like one if dropped.
 

dknguyen

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
I'm Kody, a new electronics hobbyist (complete random urge to become one) and found a Fischer Stereo on the side of the road. This is my second post relating to a topic like this, but can anyone tell me if it's worth selling or salvaging, and what quality parts I might find?

P.S.
My knowledge on electrical engineering is pathetic but I'm in the process of gathering tools, parts, supplies to experiment with, which is why I ask these questions.


One more question? Taking apart electeonele, a.e. an old crt tv, I find copper wire wound around a dark rock like material that isn't magnetic. I believe it's the flux but does anyone know what this rock like material is? I say rock because it cracks like one if dropped.
Are you sure it's not just a wirewound resistor on a ceramic core?
https://www.digikey.ca/product-deta...MI7v7Mo7Op3AIViv5kCh1FogUBEAYYASABEgL4qfD_BwE
https://www.ebay.com/itm/Ceramic-Tu...erance-Fixed-Wirewound-Resistor-/311418816327
 

sircharlton

New Member
The extra message to identify the unknown material was just a wondering question and may make a separate post for it. For some reason I thought it may be graphite but I'm an idiot to think they'd use that, if it even has correct properties for electric
 

dknguyen

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Most Helpful Member
The extra message to identify the unknown material was just a wondering question and may make a separate post for it. For some reason I thought it may be graphite but I'm an idiot to think they'd use that, if it even has correct properties for electric
If it's graphite it would be jet black. I doubt it is though. Sometimes a material is just there to provide mechanical structure for the wire coils but not interfere electrically or magnetically. And in some cases the coil might get very hot so the material has to be able to withstand that which ceramic can do. Graphite can withstand high temperatures too but graphite is also conductive which means you can induce currents in it by placing it inside a changing magnetic field (i.e. changing the current through the coils produces a changing magnetic field) which you might not want.
 
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dknguyen

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OP said the material wasn't magentic though. How could ferrite not be magnetic?
 

ChrisP58

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He probably meant that it wasn't magnetic on it's own. (didn't attract iron)

Probably didn't test to see if a magnet would stick to it.
 

gophert

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sircharlton

New Member
So sorry. It does work. If anyons recognizes me in the future, just know I own an irrigation business and sometimes get caught up in short, but important contracts
 
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