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Repeal Health Care Reform Law?

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killivolt

Well-Known Member
3v0, I will try to do that but, I think that is what I did and just tried to submit and it kicked me back again.

I think they know who's voting and don't need me:D hahahaha

I will try again.

Edit: I only had a sign in Name e-mail on the right side of the page. Nothing on the lower left.
 
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killivolt

Well-Known Member
That means I voted twice. Hope they have a data base that will exclude additional votes.

Now I'm branded as one of those people:)

Edit: Not to worry, I put in my junk e-mail address. I never go there to look at anything.
 
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ronv

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
I just have to throw some gas on the fire. :)
I think we all need to go back to Reloadron's post #15 to see the real problem.
Here is a medicare number that makes you wonder why he pays 13K when average spending for an old fart like me is less than 6K.

Spending per beneficiary is highly skewed, with 10% of
beneficiaries accounting for two-thirds of total Medicare
spending. Medicare spending for beneficiaries in their
last year of life is on average four times greater
($22,107) than for all other beneficiaries ($5,694).

Bet your insurance company didn't pay 100% of that 100K bill -- but if you had not had insurance that 100K is what you would have had to pay. Strength in numbers I guess.

That job was probably worth 30K but somebody has to pay for the guy that broke his neck and didn't have insurance or 100k.

Huckelberry knows it won't be repealed, he just knows it's an easy way to make money.
All this stuff drives me nuts. Republicans made a big deal about Obama's death panels. Here in Arizona they (Republicans) just saved 5 mil from the state budget for transplants for medicaid patients. Only 2 have died so far. One was already scheduled for surgery.
 

Reloadron

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Looking back at my post #15:

I can tell you this. My employer currently pays $13,000 per year per employee as does my wife's. My total co pay is about $2,500 annual and that includes coverage for my wife. Her plan is fully paid (still) by her employer and cost them about $13,000 a year. Her plan also covers me. They are both excellent plans. Can't tell you about having babies (the last one was $5,000) but last year I had a disk repaired in my neck, that alone was about $100,000.
Yes, my employer pays out right around $12,000 annually per employee in health care coverage. My share is about $2,500 in contributions. However, that is an exceptionally good deal. Typically the employee has a 50% copay or what would be about $6,000 annually.

The company I had worked for was Marine Mechanical Corporation which was an ESOP company meaning the employees owned it. During that time we had 100% paid medical to include dental and vision. We were bought by B&W (Babcock & Wilcox) corporation about 4 years ago.When that deal was cut our then CEO worked her ass off to get us the very best possible deal. That deal included that B&W would contribute close to $4,000 annually to each vested employees (those of us there for 5 years when the sale went through) medical above and beyond the 50/50 or so with employee matching funds for medical. That deal was for life! Damn, I loved that woman. :) This does not apply to new employees.

My disk surgery through my neck cost over $100,000. The plan also has a deductible limit which I exceeded. When all was said and done and all the bills paid my share was $3,000. There was even a funny irony to this. While I was home on medical just as Kathy (wife) squared away all the bills I got a call and email from my boss. We got an unexpected performance bonus of $3,500 per employee that would show up in my next check. That was pretty damn sweet! Unfortunately that was added to my pay and taxed but what the hell. After the taxes it was just about what the medical bill was. I looked at Kathy and said Oh well easy come, easy go.

As to my medical, dental and vision plan. B&W uses "Flex Choice" so we go online and choose from several plans for the plan that best suits us. My kids are grown with kids of their own so beyond Kathy we don't have or need dependent coverage. I like this system.

Beginning in January of this year Kathy opted out of her work plan and they pay her not to participate. That was another very nice option. The only down side is that money is taxable but what the hell it is nice added income to stash away.

Ron
 

ronv

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Sounds like you have a great employer.

The point I was trying to make was that I don't think we went far enough on health care. From where we are at now I think the only way to drive down the costs are to go to single payer.
 

HiTech

Well-Known Member
I don't understand how the US Gov. could force it's citizens to pay for healthcare when that appears to be un-Constitutional by the very nature of "forcing a purchase".
 

HarveyH42

Banned
Not everyone wants or needs health insurance. What we need, is to be able to afford the health care in the first place. The price of the service is greatly inflated. I grew up without health insurance, family of 7, and we got by just fine, and most definitely in the lower middle-class. I get insurance through work, it's not expense, and have never used it, been paying for it almost 20 years, could easily do without. I'm sure there are a lot of people, who don't have much use for the medical profession, and the money could be better spent on other things. Car insurance is mandatory, but you can chose not to drive. Homeowners insurance is only require when you have a mortgage. The part that bugs me the most, is that we aren't given the option. Health insurance was made a high priority for us, without any say in it. Sure, it's a great idea for some, but an needed burden for others.

I also don't like the way it was written or passed. All the closed door dealings under the table, and vote buying and selling, to squeeze it through. It was voted down for a reason, and should have be left for more work, and thought.
 

ronv

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Most Helpful Member
I don't understand how the US Gov. could force it's citizens to pay for healthcare when that appears to be un-Constitutional by the very nature of "forcing a purchase".
Just like medicare, social security & workmans comp.
 

HarveyH42

Banned
Unfortunately, this law is mostly about Health Insurance, and very little to do with actual Health Care, which should be a huge tip-off that we are being ripped-off. More greedy hands in the mix, means we are all going to end up paying out more, and getting less actual medical attention. I've already have seen some costly changes to my coverage from work, and got a hunch it's only the beginning, just a rush job, to comply with the portions of the law that went into effect this year. The new law is confusing, being that it was rushed through, along side another law to correct (add/remove vote buying deals). There are really no limits on the cost of medical services, or the price of insurance coverage, nor any guarantees on how much of the medical services are covered, and what portion still needs to be paid, out of pocket. This years big addition, is an annual $2,500 deductible, and then the insurance kicks in by paying 80%. I've made it 48 years, without any major medical problems, and tend to all the small stuff myself, so really can't tell if this is a good deal, just sounds like we are now looking at paying a lot more.

I'm really hoping that Obama is a one term wonder, and our next president is able to repeal this law, before too much more damage is done. I kind of doubt things will revert back to the way they were a year ago, but I can see a lot more costly changes, if every American is 'entitled' or obligated to have health insurance, as most will use it to the fullest extent.
 

ronv

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So I would guess you are opposed to single payer (Medicare for all). Why?
 

HarveyH42

Banned
So I would guess you are opposed to single payer (Medicare for all). Why?
I don't really know much about health insurance or Medicare, as I've not needed much in the way of medical attention, nor foresee much need in the future. I just see the price of the coverage I carry through work going up, and and a lot more rules and how much of the medical bill I'll be required to pay myself. Once figured the idea behind buying insurance, is that the medical bill would pretty much be completely paid, and it was, until this year, and ObamaCare. Looks like I'll be on the hook for $2,500 (deductible), 20% of the final bill, anything that was excluded, oh, and the co-pays, for each visit, while being treated.

What I expect from Health Care Reform, would be that an individual could reasonably afford to deal directly with their doctor. Might not be easy, and take a little while to payoff, but certainly not a bigger crisis, than what brought the individual into the doctor's office to begin with. Insurance would be great for some, who see the need, as with kids, or risky occupations or hobbies, or just have trouble putting money aside for a rainy day. Health insurance is like a never ending medical bill, even if you never get sick or hurt, which is my case, but now I'm looking at paying a large portion of the medical bill.

I can see where paying into Medicare, and Social Security is a good idea, as we are all going to need something in our old age, and may not have children or family to leach off, nor do we really want to be a burden to anyone. I would even mind paying in a reasonable sum, and be given any medical treatment I might require through out life, at no further expense. But this insurance isn't set rates, not complete coverage, not to mention millions of people who don't contribute.
 

ronv

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Most Helpful Member
I don't really know much about health insurance or Medicare, as I've not needed much in the way of medical attention, nor foresee much need in the future. I just see the price of the coverage I carry through work going up, and and a lot more rules and how much of the medical bill I'll be required to pay myself. Once figured the idea behind buying insurance, is that the medical bill would pretty much be completely paid, and it was, until this year, and ObamaCare. Looks like I'll be on the hook for $2,500 (deductible), 20% of the final bill, anything that was excluded, oh, and the co-pays, for each visit, while being treated.

Do you think Obama Care caused that? Or could it be you employer is trying to reduce his health care costs?

What I expect from Health Care Reform, would be that an individual could reasonably afford to deal directly with their doctor. Might not be easy, and take a little while to payoff, but certainly not a bigger crisis, than what brought the individual into the doctor's office to begin with. Insurance would be great for some, who see the need, as with kids, or risky occupations or hobbies, or just have trouble putting money aside for a rainy day. Health insurance is like a never ending medical bill, even if you never get sick or hurt, which is my case, but now I'm looking at paying a large portion of the medical bill.

Yep a return to the good old days before MRI and Cat Scans and stuff. But we do live longer I guess.


I can see where paying into Medicare, and Social Security is a good idea, as we are all going to need something in our old age, and may not have children or family to leach off, nor do we really want to be a burden to anyone. I would even mind paying in a reasonable sum, and be given any medical treatment I might require through out life, at no further expense. But this insurance isn't set rates, not complete coverage, not to mention millions of people who don't contribute.
I'm with you there. I think that's part of the deal that everyone will need it if they have it or not. I just look at my neighbor (from an earlier post) that had to pay full price for his son. I think his total bill was $150K. I'm not sure he would have been treated if it hadn't been for his dad. If he would have you and I would have paid for it anyway.

Here is an interesting blurb on uninsured costs.

http://www.electro-tech-online.com/...-pays-and-what-would-full-coverage-add-to.pdf

What I can't figure out is where all the extra money goes. I keep reading that Medicare spends about $6800 per year for each person over 65 (excluding the last year of life) yet here is Reloadron's company paying 12K a year to insure young people. Do you think the insurance companies pocket the rest or do the doctors sock it to the good plans.
 

ronsimpson

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
My school mate is the president of a hospital. He said it is very hard to get money out of insurance companies. Every company has different roles and different amounts they pay. You must do it right or they don't pay. He spends 30% of his budget on a heard of phone operators that spend all day fighting with the insurance companies. He assumes the insurance companies must have a operator for every one he has.

Medicare has a role book that looks like two phone books. One infraction and you don't get paid. Four phone calls to get one check. 4 to 6 months late and then they might pay 80% or 50% because some box was not checked. Back on the phone.

The theory is that HMOs should not have this problem.
 

ronv

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Most Helpful Member
I think that is the same way medicare works. Maybe the book is just bigger.
 

ronsimpson

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Most Helpful Member
What I can't figure out is where all the extra money goes.
The extra money goes from the insurance company directly and indirectly to my congressman so he can retire. He knows who he works for and it is not me.
The new laws will be half written by insurance companies, via my congressman, and half written by well meaning misinformed people. God help us all.
 

HarveyH42

Banned
The one really strange point of this Health Care Reform, is that our country was in a deep recession, high unemployment, people getting laid off, homes getting foreclosed, and the number one priority, was to force this bill through legislation, even with a Democrat trinity, they still had to resort to some shady dealings. With the economy in such a bad state, employers reducing staff, how is forcing health insurance a good move? I scares employers away from increasing the number of people they are going to split the cost with. It's taking more money out of the economy, not moving some back in. The bail-out billions didn't make much sense either, it just bypassed the economy, and the people who needed help, and went right into the pockets of the people who would have eventually gotten a good portion anyway. Low interest/no interest loans, where most was probably short term invested overseas, and millions made, loan re-paid.

Friday, read a news article about Obama running for a second term. I can only hope that was somebody's idea of a cruel April Fool's joke. Haven't we suffered enough? Have seen if anybody decent is running yet. Guess it's cheaper to wait until the last minute, and gives the competition less time to dig through their dirty past...
 

ronv

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Most Helpful Member
The extra money goes from the insurance company directly and indirectly to my congressman so he can retire. He knows who he works for and it is not me.
The new laws will be half written by insurance companies, via my congressman, and half written by well meaning misinformed people. God help us all.
Whoee, That is a lot of money. But maybe it's possible. You supose that's why they didn't push through the single payer and cut out the insurance companies?
 
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