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Rechargable Batteries

JonSea

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
INPUT from WHERE?????????????

Both cords say USB Input but it does not say where the input comes from. Car cigarette lighter? Camp ground electric box? Wall outlet 120vac?
As I stated above rather clearly, you have two options:

A 120VAC to 5VDC USB "wall wart" - if you've brought a piece of electronics in the recent age, it probably came with one of these.

A 12VDC to 5VDC USB cigarette lighter plug adapter. These are the standard to charge any recent cell phone in the car.

You will connect one or the other of these to the charger base with a USB micro cable (most common) or a USB A to USB C cable.

You should be able to to find either type of power supply for around $5 (make sure they can supply 2 amps) and another $5 for the USB cable.

A standard micro USB cable connects the charger to a USB wall wart. 2.1 amp wall warts are pretty common - it shouldn't be a problem to find one.

Also, you could use a USB cigarette lighter plug to power the charger which is perfect for charging on the road.
 

audioguru

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
A computer has a USB-C output but many will not provide 2A.
A charger (wallwart or car cigar lighter adapter) for a cell phone has a USB-C output but many will not provide 2A.
Many USB-C to Micro USB cords are sold.
 

JonSea

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
A computer has a USB-C output but many will not provide 2A.
A charger (wallwart or car cigar lighter adapter) for a cell phone has a USB-C output but many will not provide 2A.
Many USB-C to Micro USB cords are sold.
Some cell phone chargers do have a USB C output connector, but it is still far from common. The most common cell phone charger wall warts, and the cheapest, easiest to purchase ones have a standard USB type A connector.
 

audioguru

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
I know what a Micro-USB is and I know what an old larger USB is but I never heard of a USB-A or a USB-C.
I found a photo of the six (!) most common USB connector types. It says the old large original USB connector is USB-A.
 

JonSea

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
USB type A is the rectangular connector that typically plugs into a computer, USB power supply (line voltage AC or 12VDC types) or USB battery packs. The picture shows a cable with a type A plug on the left and a micro-B on the right.

SmartSelect_20190525-163414_Firefox.jpg

A USB wall wart is shown below - this is a typical 120VAC version.

SmartSelect_20190525-163323_Firefox.jpg

Plug the cable type-A plug into this power supply and the micro-B into the battery charger.
 

gary350

Well-Known Member
I like this new battery charger it shows me how much charge each battery has, how low they are, how fast they charge. when they are fully charged. I have marked my batteries, A B C D and have noticed while using these batteries A C D go dead but B does not go dead. I use C D in the camera they lasted about 2 weeks charge shows them both dead. I use A B in the camera they lasted about 1 week charger shows A is dead B has a full charge. Question is does B have a problem because it does not go dead OR does A have a problem because it does dead first?

Next thing to try is put B C in camera to see if B stays charged and C goes dead first?

But maybe A C in camera will snow A has a problem if it goes dead first?

Volt meter shows A=1.32v B=1.48v C=1.33v D=1.34v

All 4 batteries in charger shows A C D need to be charged and B does not need to be charged?

Batteries appear to be in series in camera how can 1 battery use all its power while other battery stays fully charged?

The reason there are only 2 batteries in the charge is because I have to use 2 to take this photo.

118966
 

audioguru

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
It looks like your new charger has a problem showing or detecting battery B voltage.
 

gary350

Well-Known Member
I have learned if I discharge a battery too low the new smart charger will not recognized the battery as being a battery. I have to use the old stone age battery charger to charge batteries for 20 minutes to get the new smart charger to recognize battery is not a block of wood so it will charge it.

119989
 

Garrent47

New Member
I have learned if I discharge a battery too low the new smart charger will not recognized the battery as being a battery. I have to use the old stone age battery charger to charge batteries for 20 minutes to get the new smart charger to recognize battery is not a block of wood so it will charge it.

View attachment 119989
That's a good trick. Gonna give this a try.
 

MrAl

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
I have learned if I discharge a battery too low the new smart charger will not recognized the battery as being a battery. I have to use the old stone age battery charger to charge batteries for 20 minutes to get the new smart charger to recognize battery is not a block of wood so it will charge it.

View attachment 119989
That's a Smart charger ha ha. Needs to go back to Charger School.
Some are better though.
 

audioguru

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
I would disagree :D - it's 'smart' enough to know that the battery has been discharged below what it should, so dismisses it as a ruined battery.
It is a Ni-MH battery, not a lithium battery. A Ni-MH battery is fine when completely discharged, but a lithium battery is ruined.
 

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