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Proteus Oscilloscope

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Reaper06

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Hello
Probes you connect to Oscilloscope channels have a ground clip too but in the proteus the oscilloscope channels don't have such thing and as you can see in this circuit i want to see the signal wave for C1 , like C2, but with this wiring channel A shows the input Signal, so what should i do ?Capture.JPG
thank you
 

renato2

New Member
I don't know Proteus. But, if it's a virtual oscilloscope, it might be able to calculate and display the difference, between two channels. So it can solve your needs:
Connect either side of C1 to a separate channel each, i.e. to A and B, then do the math A-B. You can connect C2 to input C.
Inputs of virtual oscilloscopes are imho always internally connected to ground, so don't need a ground "clip".

cheers
 

Reaper06

New Member
I don't know Proteus. But, if it's a virtual oscilloscope, it might be able to calculate and display the difference, between two channels. So it can solve your needs:
Connect either side of C1 to a separate channel each, i.e. to A and B, then do the math A-B. You can connect C2 to input C.
Inputs of virtual oscilloscopes are imho always internally connected to ground, so don't need a ground "clip".

cheers
thank you for answering. you are right, the problem is that ground is internally connected to the circuit ground so i can't see the signal of a single component and about the A-B thing as you can see i only have the A+B option
Capture.JPG
 

Reaper06

New Member
The ground is assumed.... This is a four channel scope... There is no waveform on B as this is a rectified source.... If I put 5vac into C1 at 20hz ~20Khz B reads a dc voltage...
yes the problem is that the ground is assumed, also i know there is no waveform on B, i want to see the DC voltage for C1 just like C2 but it shows the input.
Capture.JPG
 

JimB

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renato2

New Member
Yeah JimB, that's it! Look, think, sometimes RTFM - then solve the problem.
Btw, the circuit above has not load. Hence, after all C's are fully charged, full AC across C1 and the peak-peak AC across C2 will be visible.

Renato
 

JimB

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
Yea (invert)A+B looks ok but i don't know if it is the correct approach
Well, lets put it this way, it has been the usual approach to the problem since I started using real oscilloscopes, about 50 years ago.
So I guess that it should work on a computer "game type" oscilloscope.

JimB
 

Reaper06

New Member
Well, lets put it this way, it has been the usual approach to the problem since I started using real oscilloscopes, about 50 years ago.
So I guess that it should work on a computer "game type" oscilloscope.

JimB
i don't know how old oscilloscopes work but today's oscilloscopes usually have a probe like this :
4750140.jpg
and the usual approach is that you simply connect the ground clip and probe tip to any single component and it shows the signal on a single channel. no need for inverting and Summing and using 2 channels. so i wondered if anyone who is expert in PROTEUS "Game?" could help me with that. sorry for wasting your time asking questions about games.
 
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Ian Rogers

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so i wondered if anyone who is expert in PROTEUS "Game?" could help me with that. sorry for wasting your time asking questions about games.
Short answer is No.. That's why there is the "Add on" Analytics module… This can give graph output similar to LT spice.. Here you can see the relationship from outputs.... The "probe" inputs can be placed anywhere on the circuit so you can analyse these outputs..

Incidentally… It is dangerous to put the ground clamp anywhere but ground in a real circuit... Dave did a feature on this in one of his EEVblogs

https://www.eevblog.com/tag/oscilloscope/
 

rjenkinsgb

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Incidentally… It is dangerous to put the ground clamp anywhere but ground in a real circuit...
+1 for that!

If you need to look at the waveform _across_ any non-grounded component rather than to actual circuit ground, you must use two probes connected to two 'scope channels configured in differential mode.
(Both probe ground clips still connect to circuit ground).

Any other method involves possible false readings at best, up to catastrophic damage to either the device being tested, the scope or the user at worst...
 

unclejed613

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i often use the "A+(invert)B" method to troubleshoot the hot side of SMPS supplies. that way i don't have to worry about the scope ground being "hot". in other SPICE software, you don't have a simulation of the oscope controls. if you want to plot a voltage or current you select the node and measurement from a list. you can even display the results of calculations such as "V(node1)-V(node2) for a voltage difference, or "(V(node1)-V(node2))*I(R1) for the power dissipation in a resistor. while the oscope controls might be easy to use in a circuit simulator, it has it's limitations.
 

KeepItSimpleStupid

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
and the usual approach is that you simply connect the ground clip and probe tip to any single component and it shows the signal on a single channel. no need for inverting and Summing and using 2 channels. so i wondered if anyone who is expert in PROTEUS "Game?" could help me with that. sorry for wasting your time asking questions about games.
Totally disagree. In older scopes the clip is connected to earth ground. All sorts of sparks happen if grounds are at different potentials.

In newer scopes and instruments there is a maximum permissible limit that ground can be floated.
 
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