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Legacy Programmers

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Inquisitive

Super Moderator
For lack of a better term I'll call them "legacy" programmers.

There are deals on older Microchip programmers such as ICD 2 on Ebay. Some are tempting. Some are just the programmer, no cables which I believe are RJ-11 and some USB, some RS-232. Does the ICD 2 function without RS-232 cables or are these devices not worth looking at?

Can the parts be pieced together to make a working system?

Any ICD 2 users out there that can share their experiences or insight?

Thanks for your time and consideration.
 

be80be

Well-Known Member
RJ-12 is what it used
The one with usb would be nice the rs232 maybe harder to work if you don't have a comport on the computer
They still work with older chips and older microchip software but the pickit3 clones are so cheap i'd just grab one of them.
And a pickit2 it's still really handie I use one for the logic tools and to fix baseline chip's with bad osccal setting.
 

JonSea

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Most Helpful Member
PICkit 2 clones that work flawlessly are about 8 bucks on ebay.

If making a programmer work is your desired project (rather than actually programming chips), have a ball.
 

be80be

Well-Known Member
I think the early ones didn't have usb or I have seen sch without the usb on there site when I first made my pickit2 clone.
I ended up buying a real pickit2 to make a clone had to program the chip somehow.
 

Inquisitive

Super Moderator
I have a original pickit2. As for the ICD2 was thinking of the in circuit debugging and device headers for troubleshooting and learning,if the header devices are still obtainable. Was considering it an stepping stone prior to going to pickit3. Was wondering if it was worthwhile to check out. Occasionally a Real ICE comes up for sale online but they are stripped of all accessories and cables. Just bare bones units. That might be a useful tool. If they are stripped down what would need to be purchased or added to make them functional? Is it feasible?
 

Dan Soze

Member
I have a original pickit2. As for the ICD2 was thinking ...
The ICD2 is useless because Microchip no longer provides ICD2 USB driver updates for current OS versions.

The last configuration I had working was WindowsXP-pro (32-bit) with MPLAB version 8.92 and the ICD2.

MPLAB version 8.92 works more reliably with the PICkit2 than the ICD2.

MPLABX does support the PICkit2 for many of the older targets but not the ICD2.
 

tumbleweed

Active Member
I second what Dan said. Also, the ICD2 needs a VPP voltage limiter for a number of chips.

In most cases the RealICE isn't worth the money. Mine basically just gathers dust.

You'd be better off with a pickit3 or ICD3. At least that way you're not limited to what chips you can program, and you can use either MPLAB v8.92 or MPLABX. The ICD3 is a bit faster and can supply more current if you power the target from the tool (about 150mA vs 25mA for the pickit3).

For any of the really new chips you're stuck with MPLABX since MPLAB8 won't recognize them.
 

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
That is only an ICSP programmer. It does not provide debugging, correct?
Not even that, it's simply a board that provides a socket in order to program a PIC, you then take it out of the socket and fit it in your target board.

Useful device though, I built my own on a small bit of veroboard and fitted an 18 pin ZIF socket on it, it simply plugs in the PICKit 2 0r 3.

But as for the topic of this thread, how about the new PICKit 4?
 

tumbleweed

Active Member
how about the new PICKit 4?
The jury's still out on that one. Maybe for in the future, but right now it's missing support for a number of devices.

It has the advantage that it doesn't constantly update its firmware as you change device families, and it can supply a little more current than the pickit3 (50ma vs 30ma). It's a tad bit faster.

You'd be stuck using MPLABX/IPE. There's not even a command-line interface yet (supposedly coming in the april update).
 

Ian Rogers

User Extraordinaire
Forum Supporter
Most Helpful Member
Anyone have experience with the Chinese PICKIT-3 clones?
Yep!... I use it every day... My original has been on the shelf since the day I bought the clone... Never faltered.
 

Mickster

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Not even that, it's simply a board that provides a socket in order to program a PIC, you then take it out of the socket and fit it in your target board.

Useful device though, I built my own on a small bit of veroboard and fitted an 18 pin ZIF socket on it, it simply plugs in the PICKit 2 0r 3.

But as for the topic of this thread, how about the new PICKit 4?
Did a similar thing with some phenolic PCB and toner transfer/FeCl etching and a 40-pin ZIF.
Yellow header jumper selects between 40/28 pin DIP's and 8/14/18 pin DIPs.
8/14/18 pin devices sit in the ZIF with pin 1 at the black Sharpie line.
IMG_0894.jpg IMG_0895.jpg
 

be80be

Well-Known Member
Just power the chips and the clones work great that's the only problem I've had I was use to the pickit2 being able to power what ever I was doing the pickt3 can't.

The one I have is lucky if it put's out 20 mA it just about can't blink a led without over loading it the brite side is it shuts off it hasn't broke it.

I just power them now with a power supply.
 

be80be

Well-Known Member
This is not bad
The MPLAB PICkit 4 In-Circuit Debugger allows fast and easy debugging and programming of PIC®, dsPIC® and AVR flash microcontrollers at an affordable price point, using the powerful graphical user interface of MPLAB X Integrated Development Environment (IDE). The MPLAB PICkit 4 is connected to the design engineer's PC using a full speed 2.0 USB...
 

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
Did a similar thing with some phenolic PCB and toner transfer/FeCl etching and a 40-pin ZIF.
Here's my veroboard version using an 18 pin ZIF. As well as the four track cuts you can see, there are the usual nine others underneath the socket.

I built it because I was making a fair number of boards for a customer, with no ICSP on board, so popped the chips in the ZIF and programmed them before fitting.

ZIF_Board.png
 

Mike - K8LH

Well-Known Member
A 20-pin DIP or ZIF socket can be wired for programming 8-pin, 14-pin, 18-pin, and 20-pin devices... Similarly, 28-pin and 40-pin devices can share a DIP or ZIF socket wiring pattern.



If you flip and superimpose the patterns above, you could use a single 40-pin ZIF socket (or three SIL sockets) and two connectors to program most PIC DIP devices. That's how MeLabs designed their programmer adapter board. I did a simple layout back in 2004 that could use three single-inline sockets or a 40-pin ZIF socket with connectors for my home made programmer and the MeLabs serial programmer but I never built one because I had the MeLabs adapter board already;

 
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Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
A 20-pin DIP or ZIF socket can be wired for programming 8-pin, 14-pin, 18-pin, and 20-pin devices.
My veroboard layout is wired for some smaller devices as well, but I can't remember whereabouts you have to insert them :D

As I only ever used it for 18 pin devices, and I happened to have an 18 pin ZIF, I never paid any attention to smaller devices - other than adding the capability when I made the board.
 
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