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Kenwood chef mixer

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
If there's 230V from the board to the motor, then there's nothing to bypass - you already have full mains to the motor. If it's not going round, then the motor is broken somewhere.

Assuming the blue and yellow wires do feed the motor?, then stick a 60W incandescent bulb across them, and see if it dims with the speed control.
 

b82kenny

New Member
If there's 230V from the board to the motor, then there's nothing to bypass - you already have full mains to the motor. If it's not going round, then the motor is broken somewhere.

Assuming the blue and yellow wires do feed the motor?, then stick a 60W incandescent bulb across them, and see if it dims with the speed control.

Just had another look at it. No resistance on blue and yellow cables feeding motor so motor gone. The other plug has 4 cores 2 blue and 2 white. By the looks of it the 2 blue cores are some sort of thermal overload and the white cores, I don’t know what they do but I’m getting continuity across them.

How does the speed control unit work? I put meter across motor supply and adjusted speed setting but voltage stayed the same all the time.
 

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
Just had another look at it. No resistance on blue and yellow cables feeding motor so motor gone. The other plug has 4 cores 2 blue and 2 white. By the looks of it the 2 blue cores are some sort of thermal overload and the white cores, I don’t know what they do but I’m getting continuity across them.

How does the speed control unit work? I put meter across motor supply and adjusted speed setting but voltage stayed the same all the time.
That's why I suggested putting a lamp on it, it won't work with no load.

It's essentially a light dimmer, a phase angle power regulator.

As the motor failed when dropped, you may be able to spot what's wrong with it, and potentially repair it?.
 

Les Jones

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Nigel has already told you how to test the speed controller in post #2. A meter does not put enough load on the controller output for it to work. There are at least two reasons for this. One, the SCR or TRIAC that is probably used in the controller will not latch on with the very small current taken by the meter. Second, the snubber network that is probably connected across the SCR or TRIAC will pass enough current to make the meter read almost the full mains voltage. When you say "no resistance" do you really mean that or do you mean infinite resistance ? (The meter indicating over range which is higher resistance than it is capable of measuring .)

Les.
 

b82kenny

New Member
That's why I suggested putting a lamp on it, it won't work with no load.

It's essentially a light dimmer, a phase angle power regulator.

As the motor failed when dropped, you may be able to spot what's wrong with it, and potentially repair it?.
I put a bulb in parallel with motor and the bulb did light initially but then dims to almost off.

Regarding repairing the motor I can’t see anything obvious. I’ll need to dismantle it further.
 

b82kenny

New Member
So I managed to disassemble the motor casing today. I reseated all the connections and this managed to fix it. I think maybe one of the carbon brushes had become dislodged after falling. Thanks for your help.
 

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