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High frequency

cowboybob

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
#3
How does high switching frequency accounts for low accoustic noise levels?
Gonna take a guess here (as ron noted, some more context would be useful):

First I'll assume that by "switching frequency", you mean that of a DC-DC (or AC-DC) power source (PS). And then another assumption is that the PS is supplying an audio circuit.

With those assumptions, high(er) switching frequencies would be, ideally, less likely to interfere with or alter the audio signal(s) being processed, resulting in reduced or eliminated "accoustic noise levels", i.e., harmonics, distortion, etc..

Like I say, a guess.
 

MikeMl

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
#4
How does high switching frequency accounts for low accoustic noise levels?
If it switches above the range of human hearing, then you might not hear it but your dog might ;)
 

tcmtech

Banned
Most Helpful Member
#5
Our hearing only goes up to around 20,000 Hz with most people ( far less if you are older) so any frequency above that is basically silent to us beyond any sub harmonics it may have.
 

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