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Fm Transmitters

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tonyt

New Member
I want to build a radio transmitter that can cover a city. What would I need to get? Or is it alot ceaper and easier if I buy a transmitter already build and where can I get one. Can someone please help me out on this.
 

seeker

New Member
Hi tonyt,
not to rain on your parade or anything but I and 2 friends built a small (100 watt) fm station down in texas in 1981. Only played it on friday and saturday nights and stuff. The local radio stations IMMEDIATELY called the FCC.
The third weekend we were on the air federal marshals showed up at the front door with a warrant, took ALL of our equipment, transmitter, stereos, tape decks, etc.
Ended up we all got a $5000 fine and 1 year federal prison sentence.
The prison time was suspended if we paid the 5 grand within a year.
Don't know if you're in the U.S. but if you are.....don't do it :shock:
The local stations were highly pissed cause we were stealing their listeners.
NO sense of humor at all... :lol: what's up with that?
 

Philipc

New Member
Ouch!! Aren't some radio stations 50,000-watts? You would think a small 100 watt station wouldn't even make a bleep on the radar? What kind of range would you estimate the 100 watts would give?

Philip
 

stevez

Active Member
I presume you are thinking of the FM broadcast band. With a reasonable antenna a range of 50 or more miles is possible - it all depends on a lot of things including atmospheric conditions, local noise/interference from commercial or other operations and the equipment/antennas used by the audience. I use 25 watts in my VHF FM transmitter with a mobile whip antenna and can reach 50 miles at times - more if conditions are right.

Not sure the government agencies have time to go looking for low power unlicensed stations but as suggested, your competition might. Add to that the people you might interfere with, possibly by accident, either on frequency or other frequencies. Even properly licensed and operated stations cause interference and get complaints.

I'd have to wonder about copyright laws - if you play popular or other music. I could be wrong but broadcasters pay for the use of the music - royalties possibly.

I wonder just how hard it would be to obtain a license for a modest power station. Lots of colleges and institutions have them. You might investigate and you might be pleasantly surprised. That won't solve the copyright problem but if local bands give you stuff to play the problem is solved.
 

Hero999

Banned
I'd have to wonder about copyright laws - if you play popular or other music. I could be wrong but broadcasters pay for the use of the music - royalties possibly.
Yes you do.

Here in the UK it's even worse, a business will have to pay royalties even if they have a radio switched on playing music on their premises.

I think this is totally stupid. Fair enough, if a radio station wants to play music they should have to pay and if a business wants to play music to their customers they should have to pay. But if a bussiness wants to have a radio on playing to their customers then they shouldn't, because the record company is already receiving royalties from the radio station!

There is also a good arguement to scrap these kind of royalties because playing a band's music actually encourages people to buy their music.

I wonder just how hard it would be to obtain a license for a modest power station. Lots of colleges and institutions have them. You might investigate and you might be pleasantly surprised. That won't solve the copyright problem but if local bands give you stuff to play the problem is solved.
It'll probably cost a lot of money, even for a low powered station.
 

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
Yes you do.

Here in the UK it's even worse, a business will have to pay royalties even if they have a radio switched on playing music on their premises.

I think this is totally stupid. Fair enough, if a radio station wants to play music they should have to pay and if a business wants to play music to their customers they should have to pay. But if a bussiness wants to have a radio on playing to their customers then they shouldn't, because the record company is already receiving royalties from the radio station!

There is also a good arguement to scrap these kind of royalties because playing a band's music actually encourages people to buy their music.



It'll probably cost a lot of money, even for a low powered station.
Try reading the dates on the posts, you've just replied to one over FIVE YEARS OLD
 
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