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cctv camera, composite outputs

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danrogers

Member
Hi all, i'm looking to get a new cctv camera. the model im looking at on ebay comes with a bnc connector.

my question is, can I plug that into a standard composite input? I know I will need a cable of somesort to convert the bnc but just wondering if it will work?
 

KeepItSimpleStupid

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
You can buy a BNC to F adapter and then use standard RG-6 or RG-59 cables.

I doubt the CCTV camera really needs a 50 ohm termination. The BNC is typical for high end camera's. Does the camera spec mention output impedance of 50 or 75 ohms?
 

Ross Craney

New Member
CCTV cameras are a composite output (unless it is an IP camera) & will work straight into a video input of your TV (I'm guessing that is what you want to do)
 

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
Hi all, i'm looking to get a new cctv camera. the model im looking at on ebay comes with a bnc connector.

my question is, can I plug that into a standard composite input? I know I will need a cable of somesort to convert the bnc but just wondering if it will work?

You just need a lead - or an adaptor, BNC to phono adaptors are commonplace. BNC is composite, and 75 ohms just like the phono (or SCART) connection.
 

danrogers

Member
thanks all for clearing that up :)

here is one of the cameras' Im looking at - it states 75 ohm **broken link removed**
 

ericgibbs

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
thanks all for clearing that up :)

here is one of the cameras' Im looking at - it states 75 ohm **broken link removed**

hi Dan,
A point to watch out for which depends upon your application is the view width angle.

I got a device a couple of years ago for night IR work, to over the car and driveway.
When I tried I found it had a view angle of only 5deg thats why it had a range of 15mtrs, to totally useless, all I could was about a square meter of the car bonnet.
I got my money back.

I would check the view angle.
 
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danrogers

Member
Thanks Eric and Nigel. Good point about the view angle :) last thing I want to do is to be looking at a pathing slab or something :)
 

Ross Craney

New Member
As Eric said the IR dispersion is very focused. The 15m range will be optimistic. They don't specify the lens but I'm guessing it is about 3.8mm. 380 line is about the lowest resolution. The type of mounting bracket used does nothing for attack resistance. If you are serious about the need for a camera then spend a bit more & get something that will do what you want. A few specs you want with CCTV cameras - at least 540 TV lines , varifocal lens , low light cabability ,
a 'branded" chipset (sony , samsung ) at least 1/3" HAD CCD (stay away from cmos) , backlight compensation. You should be able to get one in an armourdome for about 60 quid
 

BrownOut

Banned
I've experimented with all these cheapo security cameras, and found them all to be pretty much useless. I finally spent some real money and ordered good cameras from Super Curcuits **broken link removed** I'm happy wiht this camera's performance, but it doesn't do well in low light. There are special cams for that.

Be sure to order the lense if you're gonna get one of these.
 
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HarveyH42

Banned
I'm using two of these, **broken link removed** , and they do a good job, day or night. Replaced the lens in one with a wider angle view, get most of the backyard. Not real high resolution, but don't need to read license plate numbers. I can easily spot cats and squirrels, and send the dog out. Might post a picture of what's on my monitor later. Not bad for a cheap $25 camera...
 

Ross Craney

New Member
What you may consider a good job day or night looks to be different to me. 420 line cmos sensor - come on
 

HarveyH42

Banned
p1010894-jpg.49804


Top left: Driveway Top Right: Sidewalk in front
Bottom Left: Carport Bottom Right: Backyard

Just built in LEDs an streetlights for illumination. The backyard camera is a little out of focus...
 

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Ross Craney

New Member
I'm surprised it is as good as that , you must have a fair bit of ambient lighting. Still useless for recognition purposes which is the name of the game
 

HarveyH42

Banned
I'm surprised it is as good as that , you must have a fair bit of ambient lighting. Still useless for recognition purposes which is the name of the game

Well, I can recognize a car in my driveway, or a cat in the yard, when the dog starts barking, so I don't have to go to a window to see what the fuss is all about. I can recognize which neighbor comes over and steals my free local newspaper... But I don't really need high detail for most things. The daytime images are better detail. Fortunately, I don't live in a high crime area, and just have the cameras out, is deterrent enough. You get what you pay for, but for $25 these aren't completely useless.

I've got a B/W board camera I bought years ago, for just under $30, C-mount lens (not included), and no case, but is 520 lines, and very low light. Unfortunately, lenses were more expense than the camera, and went for the cheap, and could only get about half my backyard in focus. Didn't want to run two cameras, just to watch my dog, so switched. Need to upgrade my DVR sometime, only 4 channels, and really need 8.
 
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