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Switch that doesn't latch?

Moonman

New Member
A person on eBay is selling a "spares or repairs" VCR with a:

"Broken mains switch that doesn't latch"

Could someone explain to me what means?
 

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
A person on eBay is selling a "spares or repairs" VCR with a:

"Broken mains switch that doesn't latch"

Could someone explain to me what means?
It could mean many things, depending on the writer - however, the two main choices depend entirely on the specific model of VCR.

The first choice (and is how I would use that description) is when the VCR has a mechanically latching switch, and if it's not latching the only possible reason is a faulty switch. I have seen that fault very occasionally, and in which case it usually works fine if you stand there holding the switch pressed in - I've also seem them jammed with matchsticks by the customer :D

The other option would be a non-latching switch, with the latching done electronically, and the reason could be a great many things - one option on a range of cheap far eastern VCR's was a super capacitor which failed, it was used for both memory backup, and for resetting the processor.
 

Moonman

New Member
This is a link to the item.


When I asked the chap what he meant by a switch that doesn't latch, he replied with this:

"Something tells me that these are not for you. If you don't understand what a switch is that doesn't latch you'll not be able to put these VCRs into working order. Sorry to sound harsh but there are high voltages in these videos and you are asking about a mains switch so no I cannot in my conscience sell to anyone that is likely to blow themselves up..."

Is he right?

I fixed a VCR recently; replacing belts and capacitors, and it works perfectly.
 

Pommie

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Sounds like a condescending idiot.

Mike.
Edit, I'd move on, sounds like he doesn't want anyone to ask any relevant questions.
 

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
It's going back a VERY long time since I've seen a C7 - but I've got a vague recollection that they might have had a rocker mains switch on the rear.

If the OP wants a C7 to try and repair?, I might know where there is one - I seem to recall there was a C5 and a C7 in our 'museum' at work, and a friend of mine had the entire contents. I've no idea if they were working or not, they very well may have been, but it's been a good few decades since they were put away.

If you're interested in trying to buy one I could put you in touch with him.

He also has all the service manuals and various of the jigs and tools (which also came from us).

If you fancy a day out?, to the Peak District, it would be very well worth a visit - it's like an Aladdins Cave of old electronics gear - and I was there only yesterday :D

If you're interested, PM me.
 

AnalogKid

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
As you can see in pictures 3 and 4, the power switch is a mechanically alternate action type. Press once, and it stays indented when power is on. Press again, and it extends upon release, and power is off.

The description in post #1 means that the switch works electrically but not mechanically. The unit runs as long as you hold in the power switch.

ak
 

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
As you can see in pictures 3 and 4, the power switch is a mechanically alternate action type. Press once, and it stays indented when power is on. Press again, and it extends upon release, and power is off.

The description in post #1 means that the switch works electrically but not mechanically. The unit runs as long as you hold in the power switch.

ak
Not a 'broken mains switch' then :D
 

narkeleptk

Active Member
You missed the point - it's NOT a mains switch :D
I only see a switch to toggle between 120 or 240 on the back so it makes sense they mean the "main" front power button that turns it on and off which happens to be of the latching type..




A person on eBay is selling a "spares or repairs" VCR with a:

"Broken mains switch that doesn't latch"

Could someone explain to me what means?
The only latching power button I see is the power on/off buttons on the front.
The top unit looks like the switch is latched on and the bottom looks unlatched/off. You would think 1 good unit would be achievable but I hard to say since its coming from ex vrc repair man. Could be lemons, left over parts bin unit or good units just never got around to repairing.
 
Last edited:

picbits

Well-Known Member
I've also seem them jammed with matchsticks by the customer :D
.
We have industrial momentary switches on our testbeds, the technicians have found that a flat blade automotive fuse is just the right size to wedge in the alarm silence switch to keep it turned off .....
 

picbits

Well-Known Member
It's going back a VERY long time since I've seen a C7 - but I've got a vague recollection that they might have had a rocker mains switch on the rear.
I bought a second hand Sony C5 back in the early 80's when I was a youngster. I had to cycle 10 miles back with it on my pushbike. It used to have a fault that more often than not it would refuse to play, a wiggle of all the boards inside usually got it working temporarily again. They were good old days
 

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
I bought a second hand Sony C5 back in the early 80's when I was a youngster. I had to cycle 10 miles back with it on my pushbike. It used to have a fault that more often than not it would refuse to play, a wiggle of all the boards inside usually got it working temporarily again. They were good old days
To be fair, electronic faults were incredibly rare - almost all faults were mechanical. I went on a week long VHS course at Ferguson when the first VHS machines came out, and most of the week was about how the circuitry worked, which was pretty useless as far as repairing them went.

Whereas the Grundig V2000 machines had both electronic and mechanical faults.
 

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