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Shock/Tazer

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seklum

New Member
I have made a "sticky" Tazer type thing, but I have one problem. So far I have been successful, But I have encountered a problem. My contraption is made by this, I stick a glob of conductive goo onto the skin. This glob contains a capacitor, I need to know how time it or make it so the capacitor does not discharge until the goo comes into contact with the target. I have tested on myself with small capacitors, and have been successful, but that is when I stick the goo on, then discharge the capacitor into the glob. I need a way connect the capacitor to the goo, and discharge on impact.

Please help me
 

dknguyen

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
THe nature of your project aside, I don't know why you are having a problem trying to figure out how to not discharge a capacitor when nothing is connecting the leads and discharge it when there is somsething connecting the leads.
 

HarveyH42

Banned
One glob, two leads... Can't understand why the capacitor would discharge through the conductive glue, before agitating the victim. Oh course, get that stick crap on somebody is probably good for a broken nose anyway... Guess the shock is just added insurance.
 

duffy

Well-Known Member
This glob contains a capacitor,
Let me get this straight: you aren't shooting wires, you are shooting the high-voltage capacitor itself, right?
 

blueroomelectronics

Well-Known Member
A tazer will keep supplying current once the barbs are set. Firing a charged cap into someone will either kill them or make them mad. It won't stun but will probably make the situation far worse.
 

Sceadwian

Banned
Capacitors can not work as tazers and have the ability to provide lethal currents, simply encapsulating it will not work, some relatively complex electronics are required to control the high voltage intial pulse and deliver a safe current afterward. The smallest tazer cartridge I've seen will fit in the barrel of a 12 gauge shotgun, mind you these are for military/police use only and as far as I know not available to the public.

And Colin, come on over to my house sometime and I'll charge a capacitor up to 200 volts and press it against your arm, you WILL feel it =) You'll be lucky not to punch yourself in the face from the discharge. 200VAC has the potential to produce an enourmouse shock but it depends entirly on the available current. The pulses from a real tazer are thousands of voltage in short controlled pulses.
 

tcmtech

Banned
Most Helpful Member
A capacitor that his big enough to stun a person will do more damage to them from the physical impact than from the electrical discharge. And sceads right, a 200 volt capacitor has more than enough voltage to get noticed even with dry skin.

Try it and prove us wrong!
Then tell us what voltage will stun you and get your attention!
 

Sceadwian

Banned
Believe me I have tried it =O I set the charged flash board on my jeans one day, the points of the board got close enough to my skin to give me one hell of a zap, felt like a slap to the face. Mind you were talking an 80u cap here, not some dinky little 10n cap or something. By the way seklum, if your 'goop' is conductive there's nothing you can really do about it.
 
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SPDCHK

Member
AC is much more effective.
200v DC is hardly detectable.
200v AC will produce an enormous shock.
I beg to differ. I work with PLC equipment. Normal operating voltage 24V DC. For long distance Power Station Boiler protection equipment the voltage is doubled to 48V DC, and believe you me, if you touch those wires you KNOW about it. It's not lethal, but very clearly detectable with bare skin. 200V DC will KILL you if there's no current limiting on the circuit. In fact, you have a better chance of survival if being shocked with 200V AC vs. 200V DC. Once DC gets hold of you it never let's go. AC at least switches off 100/120 times per second. (One Hz cycles through zero twice)
 
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seklum

New Member
200v DC will not kill you unless it is continuous, I have got people with over 400v From a homemade tazer made from a disposable camera. This is simply a branch off of that but I am trying to use less power, and add range.

Will a capacitor discharge if both ends come into contact with only skin?
 

Hero999

Banned
Not the whole DC is more dnagerous than AC myth again! It's wrong AC is more deadly!

Once DC gets hold of you it never let's go.
It takes much more DC current than AC to make you freeze and unable to release yourself from the voltage source.

ESD Journal - Electrical Hazard
"Let-go" current

The maximum current that can cause contraction of the flexor musculature of the arm but still permit the subject to release his hand from the current source.

DC - this value is about 75 mA

AC - this value is about 15 mA

and varies with muscle mass.
AC at least switches off 100/120 times per second. (One Hz cycles through zero twice)
That makes no practical difference since the zero crossing time is very short. AC also has a much higher peak voltage so at 200VAC you're really receiving a 283V shock not a 200V shock.

AC current can also cause ventricular fibrillation at lower currents than DC.

Health24 - First Aid, Shock
220v at 60Hz AC travelling through the chest for a fraction of a second may induce ventricular fibrillation at currents as low as 60-100mA (300-500mA if DC).
 

HarveyH42

Banned
200v DC will not kill you unless it is continuous, I have got people with over 400v From a homemade tazer made from a disposable camera. This is simply a branch off of that but I am trying to use less power, and add range.

Will a capacitor discharge if both ends come into contact with only skin?
Yes. It's an old game we use to play in High School electronics class. Charge up a capacitor, toss it at a classmate as you say, 'Here, catch'. They look up, see something moving, and reflexively catch. But of course there was always retribution, usually some form of sabotage while you were of to get the instructor to come over to your bench to check off the assignment you just finished wiring up...
 

colin55

Well-Known Member
AC is much more effective.
200v DC is hardly detectable.
200v AC will produce an enormous shock.
I am referencing everything to the tazer project being designed by the original poster.
 
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