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Lets take a look on a linear amplifier

audioguru

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
10 ohms in series with a capacitor is not a short circuit at high frequencies. Instead it is 10 ohms at high frequencies.
A transformer works very poorly (low amplitude and lots of phase shift) at the very low frequency that you say is "slow".
 
10 ohms in series with a capacitor is not a short circuit at high frequencies. Instead it is 10 ohms at high frequencies.
A transformer works very poorly (low amplitude and lots of phase shift) at the very low frequency that you say is "slow".
I was talking about 0.33uF cap.
Beside phase shift and core saturation what else malfunctions can occur?
One of expart says, CT cant be applied to ClassD.
 

audioguru

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
A class-D audio amplifier IC is smart. It has current limiting and high temperature shut-down.
But for your electrical application you probably want to select the amount of voltage produced by your current transformer and its shunt resistance.
So select a class-D amplifier IC that produces more current than you need and connect your shunt resistor to its negative feedback input if it has one.
 
A class-D audio amplifier IC is smart. It has current limiting and high temperature shut-down.
But for your electrical application you probably want to select the amount of voltage produced by your current transformer and its shunt resistance.
So select a class-D amplifier IC that produces more current than you need and connect your shunt resistor to its negative feedback input if it has one.
Well said sir!
It maybe one reason that my ClassAB amp had " current booster".
 

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