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I need help!

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Gennady

New Member
Hi!

I'm very interested in electronics and I have tons of projects saved on my PC. I want to try them out but I don't know where to put them together. If you open an electronic calculator or somthing you will notice that the components are stuck into some kind of green board. From where can I get one or make one myself? Or is there another way? My uncle sent me a DIY circuit which produces sound effects and he made this board where the components go in. This board is like brown fibre glass with foil on it.

Thank you very much!
 

Chris

New Member
You can go to your local Radio Shack and pick up either a Solderless Bread board or a Solderd Bread Board.
Theese are general prototyping tools and are verry helpful.

The solderless kind is the best for expierementation, because you just plug in components and go.

I usally build the first version of a circut on a solderless board until I work out all of the bugs, then I will transfer it to a solderd version.

You can also etch your own circut boards, but set up can be verry involved...

Have Fun Expierementing

Chris
 

Anonymous

New Member
ElectroMaster said:
I would also recomend a solderless board, they maybe a bit more expesive but you can reuse them over and over. They are also very easy to use.
solderless board has limitation of current rating by the way what is srt a type of transformer
 

ElectroTech2002

New Member
I am a newb to the site and would like to start by saying that this is a very informative site for the novice as well as the experienced. I have visited many sites and you guys are the most professional. You give all us electronics guys a good reputation.

Ok, in college I made numerous projects on a solderless breadboard and they are very helpful for R&D (also known as research and destroy). After I had designed & tested my project on a breadboard then I used "copper clad board" sold at any Radio Shack in a kit that you must etch. Another way is protoboard, that is cut to size, solder/jump your connections together and put in some sort of case. It worked very well for my final project, which we build sound effects pedals that transmitted our signal through an FM transmitter.

Hope that I was of some help.[/b][/i][/u][/quote][/code][/list]
 

digitalox

New Member
Starting Out...

I'm in agreement, all except for the radio shack part. I've never been happy with much of anything I got at radio shack, and lucky have found an electronics store in my area with a greater selection (EPO).

Just pick out an easy proj. from your list, jot down the parts and go get them, along with a decent breadboard. Pick up a dead tree version of a beginner electronics book, or theres plenty of tutorials here on the web too to learn the basic concepts from.

Good luck,
digitalox
 

thec

New Member
I have to agree, a very professional site all the way, thanks!

I used a kind of breadboard for years, but with electric current (DC and AC) built into it... looked like a small sized cash register with diods and everything (actually got 220V through me when I should replace the on/off, foolish me).
That one really rocked, but a normal breadboard with an electric supply next to it would of course work too.

About electric supplies.. I have to say, I used a ABC80 discdrive supply (built in, I extracted it). It was awesome! Automatic switchof when short circut, SWITCHED, not with heavy coils (or whatever they're called, I'm new into this techtalk in english language ;) ) .. anyway.. sure... killing a ABC80 diskdrive is like a crime (if you know what a ABC80 is, you know what I mean) but hell that was a good supply :)

I can't beleive I sold all my electrig gear for just $100-$200 something... really really stupid. Now I'll be forced to spend ten times that for rebuing all from scratch, but at least, now I know what I want :)

Good luck breadboarding, buy one, it's worth the money and it's a great and easy to understand tool!
//Albert "thec" Sandberg
 

sparrow

New Member
breadboards

breadboards are soo much simpler and faster then soldering and unsoldering components to a solder board, less mess and smell, thats the one thing i dislike is the smell from the flux in most solder.

as for making a PCB(Printed Circuit Board) ive done it, it takes a little time but it wont look too professional, good for hobbiests, some kits requirs u to use a special paint-like marker to cover the aread u want to keep metallic, then its put under a bright light to "cook" the print on the board.
It is then put into a chemical bath where the part that was exposed to the light is slowly cleaned off or removed.
thats about it for the kit i used.
 

thec

New Member
Re: breadboards

sparrow said:
...unsoldering components to a solder board, less mess and smell, thats the one thing i dislike is the smell from the flux in most solder.
You gotta be kidding, that's what I miss with electronics, the thick fog and the smell of ... flux :) Gave that "here's a nerd living" feeling to my home, hehe.

//Albert "thec" Sandberg
 

sparrow

New Member
well sure its alright except for its effects on people, remember it has lead in it, lead isint that great fo humans., besides the "smoke" can affect people cause of allergies and such, this is why i tend to work in a ventillated area.
 
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