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Help with capacitors

L.Sad

New Member
Hi everyone.

Looking for some help in identifying a capacitor.

Im technically minded but I'm a complete beginner to electronics (looking at buying some books)

I've been given an old food blender that's recently packed up and I suspect the capacitor is at fault.

I'm struggling to identify what replacement I'd need off the markings, as follows;

68n 250v AC X2
335 1 MKP

The 68n and 335 are what I'm being confused by here if anyone could share any advice would be greatly appreciated.

Lewis
 

Les Jones

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
68 n will mean that it's capacity is 68 nano farads. (= 0.068 uF) 250 v AC is it's working voltage. X2 is a rating to say that it is suitable to be used connected directly across the mains. 335 is just the type and packaging. I suspect the capacitor will be connected either directly across the brushes or directly across the mains. It will be to suppress electrical interference. It is very unlikely it is required for the device to function. (I am assuming the motor is a series wound type.

Les.
 

L.Sad

New Member
Thanks for the reply Les. The capacitor is connected across the mains.
Even if not faulty this is still useful information, thankyou. I will continue to dig a bit deeper. Even if I never get the appliance working again it's no great loss, more something to tinker with, but would be good for my own satisfaction!

Thanks again
 

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
Thanks for the reply Les. The capacitor is connected across the mains.
Even if not faulty this is still useful information, thankyou.
As Les said, it's almost certainly not the problem - and not something I (or any other service engineer) would even look at (if it was faulty it would normally be blown to pieces, and instantly obvious). But as it's not a functional component, then even if blown to pieces it wouldn't stop the unit working.

Common problems would usually be the motor, or the speed controller - speed controllers make life difficult, because they are difficult to test - and also are often destroyed by the motor failing.
 

rjenkinsgb

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
I've been given an old food blender that's recently packed up
Those often use "Universal" motors, the same general style as in many power tools.

If so, check the carbon brushes in the motor?
If they are worn out or jammed and not making good contact with the commutator, it will not run.
 

L.Sad

New Member
Thanks for the replies everyone. Disassembled the motor a couple of evening ago, tested what I could and in the end only cleaned brushes and commutator. Now up and running again!
 

Pommie

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Might be worth trying to source brushes now as they're probably very close to being worn beyond usable and could fail again soon.

Mike.
 

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