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For what loads, active power turns negative?

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Willbe

New Member
For an arc, it may mean when an incremental increase in V brings an incremental decrease in I.
 

crutschow

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Don't really understand your question. Where have you found the term "negative active power"? Are you referring to a "negative power factor"?
 

Sceadwian

Banned
The only thing that makes sense is a generator.
Negative active power is when the 'load' is an electrical generator.
 

alphacat

New Member
Don't really understand your question. Where have you found the term "negative active power"? Are you referring to a "negative power factor"?
If AP = V*I * PF, where V*I >=0, then AP < 0 if and only if PF < 0.
Didnt think i'd need to explain it.
 

Tesla23

Member
If AP = V*I * PF, where V*I >=0, then AP < 0 if and only if PF < 0.
Didnt think i'd need to explain it.
If the power factor is negative then the average power is flowing the wrong way. As Sceadwian says, the load is a generator (or at least something capable of supplying power).

e.g. your electricity company supplying power to your house would see a negative power factor if you have a solar supply and it is supplying power to the grid.
 

Sceadwian

Banned
Alphacat, any electric motor under the right conditions can produce energy rather than use it, so any electric motor as a load in theory can produce power rather than use it. Under any normal circumstances however motors draw power not generate it.
 
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