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convert 0-5v pluses to +/-15v pulses

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softwareguy

New Member
Hi,

Could anyone suggest a simple way to convert 0-5v pulses into +/-15v pulses while using a single power supply?

Thanks in advance.
 

KMoffett

Well-Known Member
What's your supply voltage?...5V?...15V?...?
What 's the load on the +/-15V pulse output?
Is the output pulse in-phase with the 5V pulse...or inverted?

Ken
 

colin55

Well-Known Member
The only way is to have a circuit that generates +/-15v and have it turned on and off via the 5v pulse.
 

softwareguy

New Member
I will be using a variable DC supply so I can set it to whatever would be required.

Not exactly sure of the load but it would be low current (driving some op-amps).

Input/output phase is not critical but the closer the better.
 
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softwareguy

New Member
Modify this to generate -15V from a +15V supply: 12VDC Negative Voltage DC Converter by 555 | Circuit Project Electronic

Use that to power an opamp. (-) input biased by a voltage divider at +2.5V. (+) input driven by your +5V pulses.

Ken
Thanks, Ken. As you can tell from my user name (and my question) I am not much of a hardware person.

Using the circuit you suggested, could you give me a rough/ball-park idea on the frequency limitations for my 0-5v pulses?

I assume that a simple resistor voltage divider is all I need for the +2.5V to the opamp (-), yes?

Thanks, again.
 

bountyhunter

Well-Known Member
Hi,

Could anyone suggest a simple way to convert 0-5v pulses into +/-15v pulses while using a single power supply?

Thanks in advance.
Create a 30V rail and use a divider to create a +15V point to use as a virtual ground (return) for external circuits. Pulse swinging from 0 - 30V will be swinging +15 to -15 with respect to the virtual ground.
 

colin55

Well-Known Member
How long are the 5v pulses and how much current will it deliver? And how long do you want the +15/-15v. The whole thing requires much more explanation in the requirement, for anyone to propose an answer.
 
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softwareguy

New Member
How long are the 5v pulses and how much current will it deliver? And how long do you want the +15/-15v. The whole thing requires much more explanation in the requirement, for anyone to propose an answer.

I am just trying to convert a 0-5v square wave to a +15/-15v square wave. Let's say with a 50% duty cycle and frequencies of up to 2.5kHz. I would like the phase/timing of the output wave to be reasonably close to that of the input wave but it is not critical. The output wave shape is not super critical as the device I am driving is concerned with the zero crossings. As far as load, the output of this circuit will drive a couple of opamps.

The overall precision of this circuit is not super-critical and does not need to be commercial-grade. I am just using it for bench testing for some controller development.


========================================

Update: I found a 5V to +/-15V DC-DC converter. I drew a quick schematic and attached it. Based on what all of you kind helpful folks have offered, this is my interpretation of what I should do. Can one or more of you please confirm that this concept looks correct?

Thanks in advance and sorry for being such an electronics neophyte :eek:
 

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softwareguy

New Member
Or, would something as simple as this work (my apologies if this suggestion is ridiculous...:confused:...just trying to make something cheap and easy)
 

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Diver300

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
You need something more complicated than that if you want a push-pull output.

If you can get away with a pull-up resistor, you could use just one transistor.

I'll try to post something but I'm new to this computer and its drawing packages.
 

KMoffett

Well-Known Member
drawing11_raster-jpg.34458
Go with the op amp solution...very simple...however you do realize (if we haven't explained) that you will need a bipolar power supply...one with a +15VDC/0/-15VDC output.

The a transistor circuit (very incomplete) gets more complicated than shown and gets into the problem of ground references between your input signal and your out load.

Ken
 

softwareguy

New Member
...however you do realize (if we haven't explained) that you will need a bipolar power supply...one with a +15VDC/0/-15VDC output.

Ken

Thanks (again), Ken...I mentioned in one of my earlier posts that I found a 5V to +/- 15V DC-DC converter. Is there any reason that won't do the trick?
 

ericgibbs

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Thanks (again), Ken...I mentioned in one of my earlier posts that I found a 5V to +/- 15V DC-DC converter. Is there any reason that won't do the trick?

hi,
If its a NMA dc to dc converter, the answer is no.:)
 

softwareguy

New Member
hi,
If its a NMA dc to dc converter, the answer is no.:)

:confused::confused::confused:

Ugghhhh....Yes, I am confused. Yes, I am an electronics neophyte.

Here is a summary of where I am at in this process:

1) I am trying to convert a 0-5V square wave to a +/- 15V square wave that will drive the inputs of a couple of opamps.

2) I have a single unipolar variable benchtop DC power supply to work with.

3) I am of the understanding that this circuit will do what I need.

drawing11_raster-jpg.34458


https://www.electro-tech-online.com/attachments/drawing11_raster-jpg.34458/

4) I am missing a way to give me the +/- 15V for the opamp V+ and V-.

Questions:

a) Is there a single IC (such as a DC-DC converter) or a simple circuit that I can use for the +/- 15V?

b) If so, could someone please give me some specifics?

c) If not, could someone please provide some specific alternatives?

Thanks.
:confused::confused::confused:
 
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