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Camera Flasher

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Electronman

New Member
Hi,

I hacked my digital camera and removed the Flasher besides a 200uF 330V cap connected to it.
Now I want to see if I can make it flash just with that cap and an Inductor?
Or I need a more complicated circuit?

Thanks
 

Sceadwian

Banned
You need a more complicated circuit.
 

Blueteeth

Well-Known Member
The xenon tube requires a voltage of about 220-330V (300v being the normal voltage) storedin a capacitor. To ionize the gas inside the tube usually takes a fewkV, 4-6kV. Although, those peizo ignition things from lighters can produce enough voltage to trigger the tube.

So, at the very least you will need a way to charge the capacitor to a reasonably high voltage. This is usually done with a flyback converter, assingle inductorboost circuits aren't up for stepping up voltage more than a factor of 8 or 9. So if you're running it from a battery you'll need to step the battery voltage up to 300V. Plenty of informaiton on google.

Blueteeth
 

Electronman

New Member
What about charging the cap by a primary windings of a step down Transformer while I put a DC power source to it? I want to cut the source off suddenly and send the voltage to the cap via a diode?!
 

Blueteeth

Well-Known Member
You 'may' be able to use a step down transformer, but it really depends on the transformer :D Google has many such circuits, using either logic, or a 555 to alternately switch a tapped secondary of a step down mains transformer, then a full wave rectifier. Its a pretty inefficient way to charge a cap, but it will work. Again, it is more complicated than you think. You can't just put DC into a tranformer, it requires AC< or at least a change in voltage.
 
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