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Analogue Voltmeter

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Boncuk

New Member
Hi,

I'm looking for an ancient analogue voltmeter with the needle centered for zero position, to indicate positive and negative voltages.

Most desirable would be ±5V, but any range up to ±20V will do as well.

Does anybody know a source of those.

Thank you

Boncuk
 

The Electrician

Active Member
I tried 'Centre zero', it narrows it down.
I also tried 'Center zero' and got exactly the same results. :confused:
The problem is that there are some zero center meters in the "panel meter" category whose sellers haven't used the words "zero center" in the description, so a search won't find those.

You will have to just look through all 1587 "panel meter" search hits to find those, and I know there are some in there; I've seen them.
 

Boncuk

New Member
Thanks for your replies, HouseOFwax and The Electrician,

I searched for "centered voltmeter" and the result was thousands of analog and digital voltmeters.

in the meanwhile the customer has decided to use two LED bars instead.

Boncuk
 

Dean Huster

Well-Known Member
If is has to be a panel-mounted meter, you may be in for a tough search. If looking for an instrument that will do this, look to several: vacuum tube voltmeters could have their ZERO adjustment set to center value and most had a -|+ mark at center scale to set the pointer to; a transistorized voltmeter should do the same thing; a differential voltmeter not only can have a zero center indication, but you can offset that center by a precise number of volts and swing the pointer on either side of that.

For that matter, you can buy a nice differential voltmeter and ruin it by ripping the zero center meter out of it for your use. A pox on you if you take this advice.
 

colin55

Well-Known Member
If you get an ordinary 0-1mA movement, you can adjust the hair spring to create a centre-reading pointer.
Get a $10.00 multimeter from a Chinese $2.00 shop, or from an auto shop.
 

Boncuk

New Member
If you get an ordinary 0-1mA movement, you can adjust the hair spring to create a centre-reading pointer.
Get a $10.00 multimeter from a Chinese $2.00 shop, or from an auto shop.
I've tried that already. No way to get the needle centered. (max. 1/3 of the scale)
 

colin55

Well-Known Member
I have done it may times and always got the pointer to centre-scale.
It just a matter of adjusting the hair-spring. You can desolder the end of the hair spring and reposition it on the pointer.
 

flat5

Member
If you adjust to center and the meter was not designed for that will it still be linear? Will it be accurate on the low side or high side for that matter? My guess is some will some won't.

Will your application require the reading of overshoots? Will the meter still be usable for this?
 
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colin55

Well-Known Member
You are not affecting the linearity. You are only changing the sensitivity, in that a 1mA movement may now be a 1.1mA movement.
 

Boncuk

New Member
I have done it may times and always got the pointer to centre-scale.
It just a matter of adjusting the hair-spring. You can desolder the end of the hair spring and reposition it on the pointer.
Thanks for the advise. I better forget about the analogue voltmeter, since the customer has decided to use two LED bar graphs instead.
 
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