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Advise needed for running LED lights from a powerbank

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gophert

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Thanks. I would prefer a switch. Do you know of anything small and simple to attach?

If you have 18-gauge speaker wire/lamp wire, these fit right over the pair and puncture the insulation to make the connection. You just have to clip one of the wires before you place the over the cut section and tighten it down

**broken link removed**
 

DaveMK

Member
If you have 18-gauge speaker wire/lamp wire, these fit right over the pair and puncture the insulation to make the connection. You just have to clip one of the wires before you place the over the cut section and tighten it down

**broken link removed**
Thanks for your suggestion.
If I was going to add a switch, I'd want something that was quite small and looked slick.
 

gophert

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Thanks for your suggestion.
If I was going to add a switch, I'd want something that was quite small and looked slick.
Questions of style are out of my scope.
 

gophert

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Most Helpful Member
I understand thank you.
I'm not sure if there are any specifics I need to search for for compatible switch types.
Here's about 230,000 options. Nearly every one will work for your low current circuit. There is a search to make sure the switch can handle the current and voltage you plan to use.
Rocker switches...

push button switches...

Toggle switches...

Rotary switches...
 

DaveMK

Member
Here's about 230,000 options. Nearly every one will work for your low current circuit. There is a search to make sure the switch can handle the current and voltage you plan to use.
Rocker switches...

push button switches...

Toggle switches...

Rotary switches...
Excellent, thank you for that!
 

gophert

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
if you have a 5v power pack, then the switch must be rated at 5v or more. For amp rating, you need to multiply the number of parallel circuits by the amperage required by each. In case of voltage or amperage rating of the switch, anything higher than your circuit requires is allowed (recommended). Don't use the very minimum current rating. I normally pick something 1.5x to 10000x higher current rating than the circuit actually uses.
 

DaveMK

Member
if you have a 5v power pack, then the switch must be rated at 5v or more. For amp rating, you need to multiply the number of parallel circuits by the amperage required by each. In case of voltage or amperage rating of the switch, anything higher than your circuit requires is allowed (recommended). Don't use the very minimum current rating. I normally pick something 1.5x to 10000x higher current rating than the circuit actually uses.
Thank you again.
From what I can see from the info in the thread, I'm using 2.4 amps.
I think this switch may work nicely.
**broken link removed**
 

gophert

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It's a nice looking switch but you'll need to know if it is on/off or momentarily on when you push the button. You'd probably not want to keep holding the button down to show off your LEDs. That's the problem with eBay vs a relay electronics distributor selling brand name parts - you get a datasheet with real specifications and, for not much more in many cases.
 

DaveMK

Member
It's a nice looking switch but you'll need to know if it is on/off or momentarily on when you push the button. You'd probably not want to keep holding the button down to show off your LEDs. That's the problem with eBay vs a relay electronics distributor selling brand name parts - you get a datasheet with real specifications and, for not much more in many cases.
Thanks for that.
I chose this one as it had no mention of it being momentary, and is just advertised as on off.
I'm also a bit suspicious though.
 

gophert

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This one offers momentary or latching, which means that the seller probably understands the difference, or at least knows that there is a difference:-
https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/16mm-Met...utton-Switch-2-4Pin-SPST-For-Car/143164508459
Also nice but I think the latching version (24mm) is significantly bigger (longer) - they have a latching circuit block on the bottom. Photo of the latching version seems to be missing. Also, look at the delivery date. I hope it is not for the holidays. Tue. 26 Jan. and Wed. 17 Feb.
 

DaveMK

Member
Thanks to both of you for that.
I watched a video earlier that put me on to the latching switches, and I've found ones that are 12mm and 16mm, which would fit nicely.
Should I be looking for something with 2 pin, as many of them have 4 pin?
 

gophert

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Most Helpful Member
Thanks to both of you for that.
I watched a video earlier that put me on to the latching switches, and I've found ones that are 12mm and 16mm, which would fit nicely.
Should I be looking for something with 2 pin, as many of them have 4 pin?
Some latching switches need power to "remember" if they are on or off.
 

Diver300

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Thanks to both of you for that.
I watched a video earlier that put me on to the latching switches, and I've found ones that are 12mm and 16mm, which would fit nicely.
Should I be looking for something with 2 pin, as many of them have 4 pin?
Any switch with a light will need 2 pins for the switch and 2 for the light. Sometimes the light and the switch share one of the pins so that the total is three.
 

DaveMK

Member
Any switch with a light will need 2 pins for the switch and 2 for the light. Sometimes the light and the switch share one of the pins so that the total is three.
Can I just check what you mean there please.
Do you mean a light on the actual switch itself?
Could I get away with a latching switch that had 2 pins if the switch itself wasn't illuminated?
Could I get away with this?
 

Pommie

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Most Helpful Member
You seem to be choosing rather large switches. The latest one you linked to is 22mm in diameter. Do you really want one that big? I assumed you'd want a small slide switch that could easily be hidden. I.E. this. Do you have a local component store you can visit?

Mike.
 

DaveMK

Member
You seem to be choosing rather large switches. The latest one you linked to is 22mm in diameter. Do you really want one that big? I assumed you'd want a small slide switch that could easily be hidden. I.E. this. Do you have a local component store you can visit?

Mike.
Thanks for the link.
I do like the metal one I link to, and if it is suitable, I will go with that, or something very similar.
 
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