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A mVpp meter?

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1-3-2-4

Member
I need one for some caps I want to change I was told this would work better then using a multimeter since it's related for audio.

My question is it impossible to build? I've never seen a mVpp meter before and google was no help in the search. I was thinking one already built would of been better?
 

crutschow

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Most Helpful Member
What exactly, are you trying to measure?
 
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Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
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What you're looking for is called an "AC millivolt meter", but I fail to see what it's got to do with changing capacitors?. You can just as easily use an oscilloscope to do the same job though.
 

1-3-2-4

Member
I don't have a oscilloscope.. yet I wont be getting one until around Jan.

Also the reason why I need it because I'm working on a hammond organ and it's a 1962's model with wax caps for the tonewheel generator and when you change it you also change the sound because the new parts don't match the ratings of the old one.. so the magnet pickup needs to be adjusted in and out to factory settings.

that's where the meter comes in.. however me being new to oscilloscopes I wonder how should I read it over a analog meter?
 

Brevor

Member
An AC voltmeter will work, any old multimeter should be ok. I think I saw some on sale at Sears for about $ 10.00. Just make sure it covers the voltage range you need. I used to work on organs years ago. Some techs I knew would adjust the pickups by ear but using a voltmeter is way better.

By the way what model Hammond are you working on ?
 
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1-3-2-4

Member
great someone knows what I'm doing here :)

it's a A100 havent decided if I wanted to change the tonewheel filters if I do I would need to adjust it.. however one told me a multimeter would not react fast enough.. I mean I have that but they said a Oscope or a mVpp would be better. I chart I have to calibrate is in mVpp
 

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
great someone knows what I'm doing here :)

it's a A100 havent decided if I wanted to change the tonewheel filters if I do I would need to adjust it.. however one told me a multimeter would not react fast enough.. I mean I have that but they said a Oscope or a mVpp would be better. I chart I have to calibrate is in mVpp

An AC millivolt meter (or oscilloscope) measure audio frequencies and beyond. A normal multimeter is generally designed to only work at 50/60Hz and doesn't give accurate or consistant readings for the audio range.
 

1-3-2-4

Member
An AC millivolt meter (or oscilloscope) measure audio frequencies and beyond. A normal multimeter is generally designed to only work at 50/60Hz and doesn't give accurate or consistant readings for the audio range.

I think I will be using a oscilloscope since I will be buying one in Jan but as a newbie to them how would I know what my peak-to-peak voltage is on it over a analog meter?
 

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
It's easy to read the p-p voltage off a scope, it's just like reading a graph. Meters don't read p-p, they normally read 'average' - where it's calibrated to give an RMS reading for a sinewave only.
 
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