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Project using a Credit Card Payment Terminal as a switch device :))

ibobibo

New Member
Hi forum!

I'm really new to electronics and would like some advice/ideas about something.

I was dumpster-diving a few days ago and found two credit card payment terminal devices, along with some other cool electronics.
I thought it would be really fun to install it in my house as for example a light switch circuit.
My ideal situation would be that I can type in a code, press "ok", and then a light turns on. it would be nice as well if different codes did different things, but its probably easier to start by just getting a reaction from pressing 1 key.
My idea on how to go about this was to open it up, remove all unnecessary parts, and connect the keyboard to a circuit. How would you go about this?
The devices are a verifone omni 5750 (VX570), with 9V 4a, and a verifone VX820, with 9V 1a.

I'm also open to other ideas on how to apply these devices : )), please share if you have any!!

thanks so much,
ibi.
 
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If you're new, then no chance - and probably no chance anyway, as it's unlikely the required programming tools and information are available.

So basically strip everything out, other than the display and keypad, and replace the insides with an Arduino (or similar) and program that to do what you want.
 
For a beginner this might be a heavy lift, but here are a couple of DIY approaches :




Regards, Dana.
 
Hi forum!

I'm really new to electronics and would like some advice/ideas about something.

I was dumpster-diving a few days ago and found two credit card payment terminal devices, along with some other cool electronics.
I thought it would be really fun to install it in my house as for example a light switch circuit.
My ideal situation would be that I can type in a code, press "ok", and then a light turns on. it would be really cool as well if different codes did different things, but its probably easier to start by just getting a reaction from pressing 1 key.
My idea on how to go about this was to open it up, remove all unnecessary parts, and connect the keyboard to a circuit. How would you go about this?
The devices are a verifone omni 5750 (VX570), with 9V 4a, and a verifone VX820, with 9V 1a.

I'm also open to other ideas on how to apply these devices : )), please share if you have any!!

thanks so much,
ibi.
it was thrown out for a reason.
 
it was thrown out for a reason.
Which was unlikely to be because they failed - most likely the shop moved to a different credit provider, and were supplied with different machines, so disposed of the old unwanted ones.

But even if they were faulty, it's unlikely the keypad and display are at fault, which are really the only useable parts.
 
Which was unlikely to be because they failed - most likely the shop moved to a different credit provider, and were supplied with different machines, so disposed of the old unwanted ones.

But even if they were faulty, it's unlikely the keypad and display are at fault, which are really the only useable parts.
They don't have to be faulty to be useless. The programming tools or knowledge may not be available, even if they are, the terminals are likely encrypted or password protected - these are credit card terminals after all.
 
From your description, it sounds like the only part of the terminal that you want to use is the keypad. Is this correct?

ak
 
It seems to be a valuable part - to him.
I get the idea of using a not very common device in a not very common manner. But it's good to be clear about which parts of the device are being considered, and which are to be ignored. Else there could be 50 posts about data terminal comm protocols.

Photos of the device would help.

ak
 
From your description, it sounds like the only part of the terminal that you want to use is the keypad. Is this correct?

ak
I get the idea of using a not very common device in a not very common manner. But it's good to be clear about which parts of the device are being considered, and which are to be ignored. Else there could be 50 posts about data terminal comm protocols.

Photos of the device would help.

ak
Yeah! the only important part is the keypad :)
heres some pictures!
 

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Yeah! the only important part is the keypad :)
heres some pictures!
It's way, way easier to design a project around a known device with a clear datasheet. For $4, you can have this...


Or for $8.50, you get this...

Or $3 - since you seem to only need one button...
 
While reverse-engineering the RS-232 data protocol for the device might be a real fun time for some, it will take a while. AND, it will require uC board of some kind to drive the device and convert its signals into lamps and doorbells and whatever.

If you are not already a proficient uC programmer, consider ZZO's advice about starting fresh. There are a ton of cheap keyboards on ebay. I'm not a big fan of a membrane keypad, especially in this application where you want a nice clicky retro feel. The keypad in the second link is an old favorite and quasi-clicky, with a little tactile thump.

If you were in the US, I'd send you a few.

ak
 
you’ll need
Not automatically. There are many simple 2- or 3-button sequential lock circuits on the innerwebber that use nothing but standard logic gates. Plus, LSI makes keypad lock logic circuits (not a uC) that handle everything.


ak
 

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