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3 Phase Electricity

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Varma21

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I understand that 3 phase has 3 conductors (excluding neutral) and all three conductors supply power. My question: If I had a 480 volt, 10 Amp 3 phase power supply, would the voltage be split across the 3 phases or would the amperage be split across the three phases? Or would each phase of the 3 phase power supply have 480 volts at 10 amps? Also how would I calculate wattage of a 3 phase power supply? Thanks, these may be stupid questions but i'm kinda confused:( .
 

MikeMl

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On a 3ρhase system with no neutral connected to the load, with a line-to-line voltage of 480Vrms, and with a line current of 10Arms (per line), the power delivered to a balanced load would be 8.314kVA.

Here are the formulas and a calculator...
 

dr pepper

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The current depends on the load, your supply has a max of 10 amps, the more the load the higher the current, the voltage phase to phase should be constant at 415v, or 240v from a phase to neutral.
If you were to run a 3 phase device such as a motor or transformer then yes the current would be distributed across all phases, if the device is single phase then the current will just be on one phase and the neutral.
To work out power on a 3 phase system assuming the current is equal on all the phases and the power factor is one you go, volts x current x (square root of 3).
 
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