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valve tester

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Andy1845c

Active Member
Thanks for the explanation:) So I guess it has nothing to do with the amount of use the tube/valve has had.
 

awright

Member
True, Andy1845c.

Video Warrior, I'm guessing that you had a mercury rectifier tube, possibly with some kind of trigger electrode. I can't imagine that mercury vapor could do anything in a triode amplifier tube other than make it inoperable. On the other hand, what do I know about early tubes. Not much! There was a lot of experimentation with exotic tubes going on in those days.

(Now it's flagging "triode" as a mispelling.)

awright
 

duffy

Well-Known Member
Ted - that big tube image I just posted was a huge mercury-arc rectifier. Google "mercury-arc rectifier" and see if your tube shows up in image search.

Andy - the metallic shine on top is caused by a "getter". A getter is... oh... wait - has this been answered already?
 

Mikebits

Well-Known Member
Ted - that big tube image I just posted was a huge mercury-arc rectifier. Google "mercury-arc rectifier" and see if your tube shows up in image search.

Andy - the metallic shine on top is caused by a "getter". A getter is... oh... wait - has this been answered already?

**broken link removed**
 

flat5

Member
"Vintage military German WWII valves.
These are the strangest I have ever seen..."

They look sinister.

other post: (gassy was already listed)

I had a leaky damper tube save my life in the desert once :)

That "manly" tube is amazing!

and some military radios are just plain ugly.
Was this one designed for someone wearing gloves in a sub-zero region?
 

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Boncuk

New Member
There is much more than the cathode that can fail. Screen grids break, filaments open, Plates open. Being that the tube is somewhat mechanical in connection, many things can fail.

Sure, if a sledge hammer is used to test valves! :D
 

Boncuk

New Member
Vintage military German WWII valves.
These are the strangest I have ever seen.......

German vaccum tubes, WWII vintage. photo - Rolf photos at pbase.com

They were inserted into the socket with the brass
pin on top first. I assume that was the connection to the plate (anode).
These were removed from German equipment left in Norway after the occupation.

Wrong picture! Those are miniature rockets, easily to be identified by the nozzle. The pin on top is the contact igniter. :D

Boncuk
 

duffy

Well-Known Member
Damn but that is one ugly radio.
 

Hero999

Banned
I like valves, not the old wimpy sort but the new kind which are still used to trigger nuclear bombs and in huge RF oscillators.

It's much more efficient to use a magnetron to generate 10GHz at 100kW than it is to use solid state technology.
 

awright

Member
Boncuk, I don't know if I'm being a sucker to your joke, but did you ever see a rocket body full of holes, totally non-aerodynamic, and with an adjustment screw in it's side? Would you have an igniter connection right in the path of a firing rocket? Do you ignite it and quickly snatch the connection away before it fouls the flight?

Who knows what the object is, but it's not a rocket. Possibly a rectifier or regulator tube? The "nozzles" look more like a grip with which to pull the object out of it's socket.

ummm, Hero999, what do you do with 100KW at 10 GHz?

awright
 
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bizz

New Member
You can use an ohmmeter and test the filaments. The filament voltage is the first number on the tube and is uisually the two pins next to the keyway on the base of the tube. If you look at the tube you can also see which pins go to the filament. Maybe after you light up a few tubes you may find out why your father collected them.
 

duffy

Well-Known Member
Yes, and obviously you have not. Read the rest of the thread.
 

tcmtech

Banned
Most Helpful Member
Just for the record. Us North Dakotans love stuff built to be operated by someone waring two pairs of gloves while in sub arctic temps! :D
Ever go to adjust the volume on your factory digital radio in your vehical with a finger thats 1.5 inches across and padded? :confused:
I can get every button around it but not the volume itself! :mad:
 

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duffy

Well-Known Member
Same here in Nortern 'Sconsin, but that is one butt-ugly radio.
 
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