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Using USB type C connectors.

Pommie

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
I'm currently designing a board with a micro USB B connector and it occurred to me that for future proofing maybe I should use a type C connector.
The connector has the following pinout,
USB-C.png

Which of these pins do I need to connect?
Am I right to assume that DP1 is Data Positive 1 I.E D+ etc.
I'm assuming that the two sides of the connector need to be connected together so the reverse plugin works.
What is CC1/2? Is it the equivalent of ID on the old connector?
What is SBU1/2? Not even got a guess on this one.
Any advice on connecting this greatly appreciated.
I note that the above table omits rows 2,3 and 10,11 as these are the RX,TX lines. What are these?
Also, if anyone has a link to a page explaining all this, post away. I like reading.

Mike.
 

rjenkinsgb

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
USB-C uses active communications between the two ends of the connection to negotiate the configuration.
That's what one of the SBUS connections is used for, depending which way around the plugs are..

See here for the USB2 interconnect:

It also needs pull down resistors on the CC pins to define the load type, without active communications; see here:
 

Pommie

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Is there a simple way to "swap" a micro USB socket for a C socket. It's going to a CH340 USB to RS232 converter. Or am I better just sticking with micro USB?

Thanks,

Mike.
 

rjenkinsgb

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Is there a simple way to "swap" a micro USB socket for a C socket.
Yes - use gnd, vbus, d+ and d- as in that first link, right at the top of the page.

Add pulldowns to the CC pins as per the second link so the power source knows it's current requirement.
 

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