• Welcome to our site! Electro Tech is an online community (with over 170,000 members) who enjoy talking about and building electronic circuits, projects and gadgets. To participate you need to register. Registration is free. Click here to register now.

Thermal fuse question

Ken1

Member
I have a Schumacher model se-1010 6/12v 10a automotive battery charger with a blown thermal fuse. I managed to pull it out of the transformer and it looks like a common 10a type thermal fuse. Only problem is it is covered with shellac and I cannot read the temperature rating of it. The shellac will not come off without scraping it. Any suggestions as to what temperature it might be? The transformer and everything else is good and the charger works perfectly when the fuse is bypassed however I do not want to permanently bypass it and create a potential fire hazard.
 

DrG

Active Member
I have a Schumacher model se-1010 6/12v 10a automotive battery charger with a blown thermal fuse. I managed to pull it out of the transformer and it looks like a common 10a type thermal fuse. Only problem is it is covered with shellac and I cannot read the temperature rating of it. The shellac will not come off without scraping it. Any suggestions as to what temperature it might be? The transformer and everything else is good and the charger works perfectly when the fuse is bypassed however I do not want to permanently bypass it and create a potential fire hazard.
It's good not to burn up. I have no idea whether this is of any help, but I like to learn new things as a rationale for avoiding other kinds of work...

Is the "thermal fuse" you mentioned listed as a circuit breaker here?

I watched this video where he replaced a thermal fuse (different model than yours) and I just wanted to say that I would have tossed anything that looked like that - not saying yours does, and not saying it should have been tossed, just saying that I would...but then again, I don't own a [edit: automobile] battery charger.

 

JimW

Member
I have replaced a lot of thermal fuses working in a repair capacity. They fail far more often than they should under a normal wear and tear environment. I would not stress too much about matching the exact temperature of the one that went bad. Standard ones of 145 degrees C would work fine. But anything else you have in that range will be acceptable. As long as it will fail if the transformer catches fire....

I applaud your diligence in finding the failure and your desire to repair it.

JimW
 

JimW

Member
Looks right. They are only a few dollars on line. If you are going to make a hobby of repairing these types of failures, you can buy a selection of all common values for not too much. Remember that if you plan to solder it in place, use a large heat sink between the solder joint and the thermal fuse (or else you will install a newly failed fuse).

The Repair Cafe where I do repairs will replace from 2 to 5 of these at each repair event. They are a common failure in appliances these days. We try to match the exact temperature when we can, but often put in an over temperature one when we can't determine the intended value. They are installed to prevent catastrophic fires, so any temperature that is less than the ignition point of the device accomplishes the job.

JimW
 

Latest threads

EE World Online Articles

Loading

 
Top