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Salvaging $1200 retail Richoh laser printer

Thread starter #1
Does anyone know if a Ricoh Alficio Mp 301spf laser multifunction is worth salvaging or re-furbishing for sale? I found it on side of road. Was wondering what power cord it needed too if anyone knows
 

gophert

Active Member
#3
Does anyone know if a Ricoh Alficio Mp 301spf laser multifunction is worth salvaging or re-furbishing for sale? I found it on side of road. Was wondering what power cord it needed too if anyone knows
Nobody prints anymore. The piece of tumbleweed next to the printer probably had more net value.
There may be some pieces in the printer (hardened steel rods) that would be perfect for building a 3D printer or other x-y gantry device (engraver, router, ...). It may also be valuable to you as a laser printer if you want to make your own PCBs (by toner transfer method or photo-resist method).
 

rjenkinsgb

Active Member
#6
If it is totally complete and working, the price on ebay is anything from £100 to £300 in the UK (looking at ones that actually sold).

The problem is that if it's in need of a drum or other service parts, they could easily cost more than the machine would sell for.

Nobody prints anymore.
What universe are you in?? :D

You can't run a business without printing documents and laser printers have very good retail values on ebay, as long as they are not so old you cannot get supplies.

The lexmark models we use would actually sell on ebay for almost twice we paid for them new.. The supplies are particularly cheap for some reason, a quarter the cost of those for some later ones.
 

JimB

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
#7
Nobody prints anymore.
I disagree.
Paper is a 1000+ years old technology, but it has this awkward habit of working reliably when you need it and in often adverse environments.

JimB
 
Thread starter #8
I think printers are a must. I'm applying for my contractors license and just to be approved I need 8 sheets of written document I had to type and sign by signature. So I had to use a printer and fax for that. I know I will too when I write up contracts for clients. However in my downtime I try to learn electrical engineering but haven't disambled any laser printers yet and all the others I have like regular ink ones didn't have much except for motors.

I had a hard time making a decision on Amazon which power cord to buy but I found out yesterday that it's 120-127v 9A 1100w cord which is no problem instead of a 220-250v which I read somewhere but must've been EU
 
Thread starter #9
After reading some comments, watching some videos, though none if them I could find about a Ricoh printer, I really feel like taking it's parts but I have to find out it's condition because $200-400 or even more wouldn't hurt
 

gophert

Active Member
#11
I disagree.
Paper is a 1000+ years old technology, but it has this awkward habit of working reliably when you need it and in often adverse environments.

JimB
The poor souls working in the paper industry wish everyone had your lack of faith in technology.
The forestry pulp/paper industry is fairly flat but newsprint and office paper are way down since 2000.

The people at the mills are just thankful that more people around the world are using more modern hygiene technologies and abandoning traditional techniques to fill demand for paper and pulp.
 

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
#12
The poor souls working in the paper industry wish everyone had your lack of faith in technology.
The forestry pulp/paper industry is fairly flat but newsprint and office paper are way down since 2000.
There's still plenty of home/work printing going on, the fall in demand for paper is more likely down to falling newspaper sales and rising Kindle sales :D
 
Thread starter #13
So does anyone know what's good to salvage from a laser printer HP officejet pro 8610? For a learning hobbyist? I'm currently a couple months in the learning and have gathered a lot of material to practice on, need to probably study more than hunting but idk lol
 

dknguyen

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
#14
So does anyone know what's good to salvage from a laser printer HP officejet pro 8610? For a learning hobbyist? I'm currently a couple months in the learning and have gathered a lot of material to practice on, need to probably study more than hunting but idk lol
The motors and gear mechanisms are probably the most valuable thing.
 

Mickster

Well-Known Member
#15
There are loads of useful things inside printers etc. which can be re-used, obviously depending upon your particular interests.
The videos below will give you some tips:
https://www.google.com/search?sourc...10k1j0i22i30k1j33i21k1j33i160k1.0.pL4Yp3zK_U8

I'm pretty sure the Post Apocalyptic Inventor is/was a member here, but does not appear to come up under that username.
[Off to look and see if I can find his content]

EDIT: It's Post_Apocalyptic_Inventor.
 

gophert

Active Member
#16
There's still plenty of home/work printing going on, the fall in demand for paper is more likely down to falling newspaper sales and rising Kindle sales :D
Most larger companies are making it between difficult and impossible to print documents. One company I visited had a wall of shame for people who printed the most pages in the previous month - it was one page of a scrolling PowerPoint on a video display in the lobby (the next page said. "Welcome our visitor, GopherT". Everything is saved to cloud drives as pdf and most employees have two or more big monitors or crystal clear iPads to read documents.

I've been in specialty chemical sales and marketing for 30 years and paper mills use all kinds of additives. Each type of paper product needs specific materials. I would love to see evidence to the contrary but office paper (copy paper/laser printing paper) demand reached its peak in 2005 at 6M tons and down to 5M by 2010 and under 3M now. The toner/inkjet companies were hurt more than the paper industry by the decline.
 

dknguyen

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
#17
Most larger companies are making it between difficult and impossible to print documents. One company I visited had a wall of shame for people who printed the most pages in the previous month - it was one page of a scrolling PowerPoint on a video display in the lobby (the next page said. "Welcome our visitor, GopherT". Everything is saved to cloud drives as pdf and most employees have two or more big monitors or crystal clear iPads to read documents.

I've been in specialty chemical sales and marketing for 30 years and paper mills use all kinds of additives. Each type of paper product needs specific materials. I would love to see evidence to the contrary but office paper (copy paper/laser printing paper) demand reached its peak in 2005 at 6M tons and down to 5M by 2010 and under 3M now. The toner/inkjet companies were hurt more than the paper industry by the decline.
I remember on one project we had to print several documents where each was a few thousand pages so someone could sign the cover.
 

gophert

Active Member
#20
Only if the company is set up for them with all the digital signature certification infrastructure.
Well, that would require downloading a reasonably recent version of Adobe Acrobat to create and Free Adobe Acrobat Reader for people to sign - see link below for the automated cloud support security and certification. In other words, Every company with a recent copy (2013 or newer) of Adobe Acrobat.

Is that what you mean by "all the digital signature certification infrastructure"?

https://helpx.adobe.com/reader/using/sign-pdfs.html
 
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