• Welcome to our site! Electro Tech is an online community (with over 170,000 members) who enjoy talking about and building electronic circuits, projects and gadgets. To participate you need to register. Registration is free. Click here to register now.

Pet owners check this out. More EPA Bullsh.....

Status
Not open for further replies.

killivolt

Well-Known Member
YouTube - Dangerous Pet Products?


This solves a riddle.

The Dog my son's girlfriend has is having the same exact symptoms. Shaking, Vomiting, Seizures.

No explanation accept when the dog had a problem with scratching everyone thought maybe fleas or something. But, it's just a skin irritation.

She was applying and bathing him with this kind of shampoo.

kv
 
Last edited:

mneary

New Member
These are poisons, and like all pesticides, they can cause serious allergic reactions in a select population of animals and people. One way to minimize reactions is to be sure you're treating the right problem. If the skin is already irritated, it's super risky to apply poison. Even I react if I'm overexposed to pyrethrins.

When one of my cats is scratching, I first check with a flea comb to make sure it is a flea problem and not something else. (Fleas leave behind a 'dust' that consists of eggs and droppings.)

[edit] I should also note that pyrethrin (an extract of chrysanthemum plant) is natural and biodegradable, and not being fat soluble does not accumulate in the body. [/edit]
 
Last edited:

3v0

Coop Build Coordinator
Forum Supporter
It seems to be a bad year for ticks here. Used a packet of the topical product and it did not work. Figured the problem was the packet was about 4 years old. Had the vet apply a another one and and it did not help either. Next we added a flea collar. Now the ticks die after they attach.

I expect if she was allergic to the stuff she would be dead by now. Still it does not sit well with me.
 

Mikebits

Well-Known Member
I can empathize with the emotions felt here as I lost my best buddy several years back (not due to above reasons, but I know the emotions). It is truly sad to lose a pet and I know this from experience. It is for this reason that I have not gotten another 4 legged pal as I do no wish to relive the loss I felt some time ago.

The sad truth is that animal treatments do not follow under the same guidelines as treatments for humans. Human medications must undergo FDA approval and this is not so for our 4 legged friends. This is unfortunate but the fact of the matter is that clinical trials cost in the range of billions.

With that in mind, one might see why mans best friend might be exposed to chemicals that have not been thoroughly tested according to Good lab practice. This is a sad but an unfortunate truth, and your best bet is to research a product as best as you can before administering it to your four legged friend.

Also consult a vet as well, as they should get reports on adverse affects in a product.
 
Last edited:

tcmtech

Banned
Most Helpful Member
I grew up on a farm. Life and death are natural. Ive buried a few pets and dont really care to have any more. Everything dies I will, you will, everyone and everything alive eventually will. I learned to accept it.

You wont know was bad for you or your pets until its to late anyway. A product thats just fine for one dog out of a litter can kill its sibling.
Same goes with people. Penicillin works fine for my brother but it could kill me!
Does that say antibiotics should be baned? Or perhaps a person should do more diligent trial testing on their own first.

False beliefs without prior research puts the pet owner partially at fault too! We always do a small dose test with a new product on an animal that has not been exposed to something before. Common sense where I come from.

Are you sure it was the shampoo? Some people put out poison for rodents and dogs love to eat that stuff! Others put out poisons just to kill strays and runners too.
My friend lost several dogs because he didn't see the point of fencing them in or leashing them when he was out with them for a walk.
The city put out poison bait to get rid of unwanted strays and guess who's dogs ran around like strays and ate the bait?
The dog only has to get out of site for a moment once to eat something bad.
 

Speakerguy

Active Member
Just so everyone knows, the chemical in question is the same **** they use in bug bombs that they tell you to be out of the house for >2 hours after use.

Thank you for letting me know about this.
 
Last edited:

killivolt

Well-Known Member
Just so everyone knows, the chemical in question is the same **** they use in bug bombs that they tell you to be out of the house for >2 hours after use.

Thank you for letting me know about this.
Your, Welcome.

kv:)
 

Hero999

Banned
I use flee drops on my cats and have never had any problems.

Whatever you do though, don't use tea tree oil on cats it's pretty toxic to them. Many antiseptics are also toxic to cats.

Also don't assume that just because it's safe for humans it doesn't mean it's safe for your pet. Take chocolate for example, humans can safelty eat large quantities of the stuff but it's extremely toxic to cats and less so dogs. Other seemingly harmless foods such as onion, garlic, many herbs and spices and grapes are have also known to be poisonous to cats and dogs.
 

dknguyen

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Why do humans seems to be so tolerant to many things that are toxic to other animals? For goodness sake...we can drink...for entertainment!
 
Last edited:

Hero999

Banned
Why do humans seems to be so tolerant to many things that are toxic to other animals? For goodness sake...we can drink...for entertainment!
Simple we have a more varied diet than most animals.

Cats have particularly poor liver function to humans, other animals have better liver function than humans i.e. rats have excellent liver function as they can eat almost anything.
 

Speakerguy

Active Member
I think cats can get stoned off weed, and I'm pretty sure you can get a dog drunk. I'm not into that sort of thing, but I do let my dog take a sip of my beer usually at parties just to freak people out.

I knew one guy (over the internet) who said he laughed about how onions gave his dog the farts. I let him know about how onions are bad for dogs and cause digestion issues (from red blood cells being killed and crapped out) and can kill them in larger doses. He was pretty shocked.
 
Last edited:

killivolt

Well-Known Member
Why do humans seems to be so tolerant to many things that are toxic to other animals? For goodness sake...we can drink...for entertainment!
Apparently cats love to drink antifreeze, but only once..:)

Wrong antifreeze.............:D


kv:)

Edit: Although there is some anti-freeze humans drink that would kill a cat.:eek:
 
Last edited:

Hero999

Banned
As far as I'm aware all antifreeze is poisonous, although I haven't been antifreeze tasting recently so I don't know for sure. :D
 

Speakerguy

Active Member
Ethylene glycol (green auto antifreeze) is toxic. There are other antifreezes out there that are actually FDA approved (propylene glycol).
 
Last edited:

Hero999

Banned
It's safe in small quantities but I certainly wouldn't drink a litre bottle of the stuff.
Propylene glycol - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

ChronicMay cause reproductive and fetal effects. Laboratory experiments have resulted in mutagenic effects. Exposure to large doses may cause central nervous system depression. Chronic ingestion may cause lactic acidosis and possible seizures.
 

tcmtech

Banned
Most Helpful Member
Mutant kitty you say... Hmmm

Google cats with wings if you want an interesting read!
 
Last edited:

HiTech

Well-Known Member
Why do humans seems to be so tolerant to many things that are toxic to other animals? For goodness sake...we can drink...for entertainment!
Actually it's the other way around.... think about it.... dogs and cats seem to be interested in consuming their own feces or that from another, they drink out of mud puddles and stagnant water, they gobble down pure fat from meat, eat out of day old, fly-infested garbage, etc., etc. and through all that they seem to digest things fairly well most of the time. So who has the stronger and more tolerant digective system? Not us humans!

As for flea/tick products I've had very good luck with Advantix drops. However it is a systemic type drug designed to kill those pests. A cheaper and VERY EFFECTIVE treatment is to bathe the animal in Murphy's Oil Soap. The fleas/ticks fall off into the bath water, any eggs also get washed off their body for the most part, and fleas cannot springboard off the water's surface due to tension created by the soap. They die almost instantly. Murphy's Soap is quite inexpensive, available most anywhere, nontoxic compared to normal flea/tick shampoos, and certaily leaves your pet smelling nice.... until it decides to roll around on a pile of doo-doo outside!!!:eek:
 

Hero999

Banned
Actually it's the other way around.... think about it.... dogs and cats seem to be interested in consuming their own feces or that from another, they drink out of mud puddles and stagnant water, they gobble down pure fat from meat, eat out of day old, fly-infested garbage, etc., etc. and through all that they seem to digest things fairly well most of the time. So who has the stronger and more tolerant digective system? Not us humans!
Actually believe it or not, our digestive systems are fully capable of digesting that kind of crap; its our disgust instinct prevents us from eating that sort of sh1t.

Our stomachs can digest all types of soft animal tissue including fat, skin, cartilage connective tissue etc. Some people in the third world eat insects, fat, raw meat, rodents, maggots etc.

There are people have virtually no veritable matter in their diets: the inuits survive the long winter on a pure meat diet, getting all the vitamins they need from animal tissue.

At the other end of the spectrum there are vegans who refuse to eat anything of animal origin.

We are omnivores and can eat just about anything, cats and dogs are purely carnivorous and are restricted to meat. Our systems can digest both meat and vegitable matter.

Unlike dogs and cats our systems can also handle vegetables which contain many chemicals not found in meat.

I was comparing the liver more than anything else: our livers can breakdown all sorts of strange chemicals not found in meat.

Rats are omnivorous, like us. In fact they're better omnivores than us, they can eat all sorts of plants that are poisonous to us as well as most of the foods that we can eat.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.

Latest threads

EE World Online Articles

Loading
Top