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Pacman eat you heart out... no really.

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HiTech

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Well that seems interesting .. but it let the other bacteria sneak off!:(
 

Sceadwian

Banned
I think they were still blue from the last super pellet. I'm sure Packman has a goon squad off to the side somehwhere.
 

duffy

Well-Known Member
HTF is that thing targeting the bacteria? Surface receptor sites for... something? And look - it ignores another bacteria and continues to follow its prey. Dang.
 

Sceadwian

Banned
Not a clue, ask mother nature =) Biology on that scale is damn difficult to understand.
 
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Sceadwian

Banned
Until you get Leukemia.
 

Mikebits

Well-Known Member
HTF is that thing targeting the bacteria? Surface receptor sites for... something? And look - it ignores another bacteria and continues to follow its prey. Dang.
Sort of works like this. Chemotaxis - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

See part on Eukaryotic chemotaxis.

I know bacterium cell walls contain peptidoglycan. This polymer is not found in the human body so perhaps it acts as the chemical attractor. That's just a guess though.
 

Mikebits

Well-Known Member
I know bacterium cell walls contain peptidoglycan. This polymer is not found in the human body so perhaps it acts as the chemical attractor. That's just a guess though.
Upon further thought, I feel my thinking about peptidoglycans as the chemical attractant may be in error as this component is also contained in the good bacteria that our body uses. So at the moment, the chemical attractant is somewhat alluding me, but I will try and investigate further.

I suspect each bacteria illicit a unique chemical signature that triggers a foreign body response. I need to do some further reading. At the moment, I think the actual chemicals involved are still somewhat a mystery to scientist, but studies continue in this area.

Just thought I should clarify as to not give possible misinformation.
 
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Sceadwian

Banned
Greek greek greek greek! Greek greek greek.
Sorry, couldn't resist =)
 

duffy

Well-Known Member
Peptidoglycan is like to a bacteria what cellulose is to a plant cell or collagen is to a human cell, a matrix of some tough stuff outside the plasma membrane.

On another board a guy was telling me that if a bacteria was the size of a car in a big swimming pool or something you would see it churning water and surrounded in a stinky cloud of various kinds of greasy crud it keeps belching out.

What I was wondering was more along the lines of the guidance system. The chemotaxis page didn't offer anything new. That video seems to show more than the emergent behavior of a cell with receptor sites all over it heading up some chemical gradient - if that was the case, then when it passes that other bacteria you would expect it to stick a pseudopod or something out that way. Instead, it actively ignores it and concentrates on its initial prey. Awesome.
 

Sceadwian

Banned
Electronics equivalent is a line follower... Same thing I'm sure, no idea what the mechanisms are though, the bacteria obviously has some kind of internal feedback that is more sensative in the direction it was heading as opposed to it's normal omni directional mode, when it picks up a trace that area self sensitizes and it goes after it, finding more 'signal' it keeps going in that direction and pasingly ignores weaker signals, I bet there are bacteria that are capable of shooting off the equivilent of chaf to confuse the trail to give it the edge to get away.
 

Pommie

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Does anyone know if that is real time. It's hard to imagine how a "blob" manages to move so fast by changing shape.

Mike.
 

Sceadwian

Banned
Pommie you have to understand the scale. That thing is only about 5-10µ meters across. By my best guesstimate it only moved about 6 body lengths the whole video. So 60µ meters in 28 seconds, about 1.8µ meters a second, that's a bit more than 7.5mm's per hour. Not exactly a speed demon.
 

Pommie

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
I understand the scale but find it hard to comprehend how "blobs" move so (relatively) quickly. It is moving half it's body length in 1 second the equivalent of a human moving at walking pace. The fact that it is moving by changing shape makes it even more remarkable. Looking at the speed of the bacteria, I'm convinced that this is time lapse and I'm curious how much it is sped up.

Another amazing thing about this video is that it was made in the 1950s.

Mike.
 

Mikebits

Well-Known Member
Peptidoglycan is like to a bacteria what cellulose is to a plant cell or collagen is to a human cell, a matrix of some tough stuff outside the plasma membrane.

On another board a guy was telling me that if a bacteria was the size of a car in a big swimming pool or something you would see it churning water and surrounded in a stinky cloud of various kinds of greasy crud it keeps belching out.

What I was wondering was more along the lines of the guidance system. The chemotaxis page didn't offer anything new. That video seems to show more than the emergent behavior of a cell with receptor sites all over it heading up some chemical gradient - if that was the case, then when it passes that other bacteria you would expect it to stick a pseudopod or something out that way. Instead, it actively ignores it and concentrates on its initial prey. Awesome.
If you choose to not accept chemotactic response as the mechanism which moves a WBC towards a target, then that is your right. I will, however, go with what was taught to me by biology professors. The prevailing theory of WBC affinity towards a bacterial cell is chemotaxis.

Perhaps this link may shed some light.

http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/picrender.fcgi?artid=1484066&blobtype=pdf
 
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Mikebits

Well-Known Member
I understand the scale but find it hard to comprehend how "blobs" move so (relatively) quickly. It is moving half it's body length in 1 second the equivalent of a human moving at walking pace. The fact that it is moving by changing shape makes it even more remarkable. Looking at the speed of the bacteria, I'm convinced that this is time lapse and I'm curious how much it is sped up.

Another amazing thing about this video is that it was made in the 1950s.

Mike.
One thing I thought strange about the video is that the WBC appeared to be flagellated, yet human WBC have no flagellation.
 

Sceadwian

Banned
There was no mention of it being human, far as I know no one has suggested it was.
 

Mikebits

Well-Known Member
There was no mention of it being human, far as I know no one has suggested it was.
And as far as I know, no one suggested that you did.

And perhaps I should have mentioned, as far as I know most mammals do not have flagellated white blood cells. My zoology knowledge is limited so I would be interested in finding out which animals do have this sort of WBC.
 
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