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oscilloscope calibration

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chris54

New Member
Hello and thanks fot taking the time to read and reply. I have an old Goldstar 20 mhz scope. It still works great but have been told that I should have the calibration checked. Is this somthing I can do or do I need to send it to some one to be done. Your recomendations please
 

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
Hello and thanks fot taking the time to read and reply. I have an old Goldstar 20 mhz scope. It still works great but have been told that I should have the calibration checked. Is this somthing I can do or do I need to send it to some one to be done. Your recomendations please
I would suggest you would be wasting your time and money, if you want it calibrated you need to either send it away (and a pay a LOT of money), or purchase an accurate calibration source and do it yourself (but you would need to regularly send that away for expensive calibration as well).

I wouldn't ever consider having a scope calibrated, even when brand new you have to spend extra money if you want it 'calibrating' - it's not about been accurate, it's about having a piece of paper saying so.
 

chris54

New Member
Thanks that was what my feeling was but wanted to ask somone who knows a lot more then me

I also am looking for a 1x 10x probe for it. Where would be a good place to purchase one. Thanks
 

hentai

New Member
there are some scopes who have a test signal output for calibration. mb ur goldstar has it too.
 

Hero999

Banned
It depends on how old the oscilloscope is and how far out it is.

You can easilly test the calibration your self.

Measure a known DC voltage source with a new DVM and the scope and compare the two results. If the reading from the scope deviates noticeably from the reading by the DVM then it needs calibrating.

Measure a known stable frequency source, the mains is the easiest one, if it deviates significantly from the expected result then it needs calibrating.

I have two old scopes, both are significantly out of calibration but I don't worry about it because I don't use them for accurate measurements.
 
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