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Make Turntable with Stepper Motor

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heri

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It's still part of the same project I've posted before but different parts, this is a turntable with a motor and voltage regulator. On YouTube they use synchronous motor, short story I bought stepper motor with driver in my local store, I intend to run this stepper motor like dc motor that I connect to voltage regulator to set the speed of rotation. Can it be done without driver and microcontroller?
 

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crutschow

Well-Known Member
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Can it be done without driver and microcontroller?
No.
A stepper motor needs a driver to provide a pulsed sequence of signals to rotate.
It will not operate on DC.
 

Pommie

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Even with a controller that motor will not achieve much above 1 step per mS which is about 15rpm.

Mike.
 

dr pepper

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No disrespect to cruts, however you can run a stepper without a driver, one way is to run it off an ac source, like a transformer secondary and use a capacitor to create a phase shift for one of the motors phases, this will probably work however you will have no control of speed, for that you'll need at least some kind of driver circuit.
One thing, steppers tend to be 'notchy' so you might get audible hum or whine from it via the speakers, increasing the mass of the platter will improve things a little.
 

heri

New Member
I was thinking, just by combining the wires to work, it just could not be done. Do you have any suggestions? Or is there a dc motor that can rotate slowly, 12VDC max?
 

dknguyen

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I was thinking, just by combining the wires to work, it just could not be done. Do you have any suggestions? Or is there a dc motor that can rotate slowly, 12VDC max?
Most brushed DC motors will, but the problem is that they will be capable of very little torque production for the task unless the motor is huge (fairly irrelevant for immobile applications unless your speed is so low that the motor would be unfeasibly large or expensive) or unless you gear it down (or use a belt-drive...simpler than gears).

Speed control is far more straightforward with a brushed DC motor than an AC motor since all you have to do is adjust the supply voltage. Which you could do from a power supply, or perhaps a variac connected to a DC bridge and rectifier (better for larger DC motors since this setup will be able to produce up to 170VDC.) No MCU needed.
 

heri

New Member
After reading the post of all of you, including the last one, I do not use my stepper motor because it adds extra work and I want it to be simpler. So I just bought this 12-N20 DC 6V 60rpm and lazy susan bearing in the local market online.
 

dknguyen

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After reading the post of all of you, including the last one, I do not use my stepper motor because it adds extra work and I want it to be simpler. So I just bought this 12-N20 DC 6V 60rpm and lazy susan bearing in the local market online.
If there is not enough torque in the motor to drive the lazy susan bearing directly, you can drive it with a small friction wheel on the motor shaft pressed up against the lazy susan, although it will spin VERY slowly since it's basically being massively geared down.
 

heri

New Member
The motor was already bought and I was hesitant to buy it because the size of the motor is very small but I will try that first. For the sides of bearing for lazy susan is about 7 cm. The rotating board uses two layers of cardboard with 4mm thick and on top of it there will be 1 kg of filament for 3d printers, which are rotated and heated.
 

dknguyen

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
The motor was already bought and I was hesitant to buy it because the size of the motor is very small but I will try that first. For the sides of bearing for lazy susan is about 7 cm. The rotating board uses two layers of cardboard with 4mm thick and on top of it there will be 1 kg of filament for 3d printers, which are rotated and heated.
How fast do you need to spin this thing? And does it have to be an accurate speed?
 
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