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M-Audio BX5 speakers

billybob

Member
1606935163820.pngI'm about to be in possession of these speakers from a friend. I know one of the speakers has a problem though and I need to know where to start to maybe fix them. After 20 min or so the one starts popping randomly and crackleing a little. I think its temperature related but I dont know where to start to fix this (I've been trying to find the schematic for the speaker)
 
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unclejed613

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
are these powered speakers, or regular speakers?
 

unclejed613

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
first check and make sure you don't have any cracked solder connections on the amplifier board. one obvious sign of cracked solder is a dark ring in the solder connection. this usually happens on through-hole components that heat up like transistors, resistors of over a watt, power output chips. as the component warms up it's through hole wires expand and can actually put stress on the solder. or there could be a semiconductor (transistor or IC) that has a thermal failure internally... you would likely need a schematic to trace such a problem, however, if you can get the amp to fail with the speaker box open, you can spray components one at a time with freeze spray. when the problem stops, you have found the bad part. i try to "drip" the spray to minimize the chance of oversprayingand hitting a bunch of parts. if you can't find freeze spray, you can get "canned air" at an office supply or computer store. turning the can upside down makes the propellent come out as a liquid and it's the same chemical as freeze spray.
 

billybob

Member
Thanks a million I will do that! You probably just saved me $80. Do you have any tips on checking components with a multimeter or a link I can check out. I find it hard to check things like capacitors since sometimes they can be in parallel with another capacitor or situations like that.
 

simpleGuy

New Member
Thanks a million I will do that! You probably just saved me $80. Do you have any tips on checking components with a multimeter or a link I can check out. I find it hard to check things like capacitors since sometimes they can be in parallel with another capacitor or situations like that.
You can do it with a multimeter (ohmmeter).
Bad: If you have for example 3 capacitors in parallel and the multimeter measures almost 0 ohms constantly, then one or more capacitors are broken/shorted.
Good: If you measure them and switch the measure tips polarity it should beep for a quarter of a second and show 0 ohm then goes up to x megaohm immediately (which tells you that they are charging/loading which is good). But the real problem is when they "looks" to be fine and have a high ESR resistance. They would work for a while but may collapse anytime or not work properly from the beginning. You could see that probably with an ohmmeter also, high ESR resistance would cause the capacitor to load slower than other exact same good capacitors or wouldn't even start to load up (to make that measurement you need to desolder the capacitors). Or you need an ESR meter (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ESR_meter). I personally use the ELV KT200 it is a component tester & ESR meter. Good luck

PS: I wouldn't buy that ESR meter for just one device, it would be cheaper to renew all capacitors to be honest. But if you repair often electronic devices, then it would be helpful to have such an ESR meter.
 
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billybob

Member
Here is an update to the situation, I finally got the speakers and opened the problem one up. There are to chips connected to a heatsink, but are a little hard to get at. One of the Ics on the heatsink heats up even when the speakers are disconnected and nothing is being played. The model number is TDA7294 1610147136805.png
I don't know if I should change this out or if there is a deeper source to this problem. The speaker was choppy when I first plugged it in and tried it out. Then it poped a few times and went out and all I could hear was 60hz humming.
 

rjenkinsgb

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Those amp ICs are readily available, I'd get a replacement from a reputable supplier - Mouser, RS or whoever, not ebay.
 

billybob

Member
Alright, I also checked the caps they seem fine. The two larger ones are in good condition. One reads around 5,000 uF when it's rated 4,700 uF is this an issue?
 

unclejed613

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
check the speaker too make sure it's not shorted or open circuit. with a shorted chip, a bad speaker is also likely
 

billybob

Member
I'm such an idiot, yes the speaker is not the problem, because as I mentioned earlier, the ic got hot even without the speakers connected. I'm going to go ahead and get the replacement ic. I'm just not to excited to solder it in in such a small space.
 

simpleGuy

New Member
Did you check the TDA7294 for any internal short? Just measure the pins 13 and 15 those are the Vs- and Vs+ (if short then your ohmmeter should show ~0 Ohms)
You can also measure the 13th and 15th pins on the pcb while the TDA7294 is not soldered to check if the short is coming from that IC or if it's still available.
Or might be that the IC burnt something else there also
 

billybob

Member
Did you check the TDA7294 for any internal short? Just measure the pins 13 and 15 those are the Vs- and Vs+ (if short then your ohmmeter should show ~0 Ohms)
You can also measure the 13th and 15th pins on the pcb while the TDA7294 is not soldered to check if the short is coming from that IC or if it's still available.
Or might be that the IC burnt something else there also
Alright, will do.
 

billybob

Member
Ok, so I measured pins 13 and 15 while still on the pcb and my multimeter couldn't decide that resistance, but it was somewhere in the high kilo to low Mega ohm range, but I figured that might be expected when connected to the pcb. I guess I'll have to try and unsolder this this thing. Not to happy about that.
 

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
Your original post was Dec 2nd - you should have changed the chip on Dec 3rd :D

As a professional service engineer the first thing you would do with something like this is replace the chip - the odds are high that that's what's wrong, and it saves time and money to replace it first thing.
 

billybob

Member
Your original post was Dec 2nd - you should have changed the chip on Dec 3rd :D

As a professional service engineer the first thing you would do with something like this is replace the chip - the odds are high that that's what's wrong, and it saves time and money to replace it first thing.
I know, I guess I was holding on to the hope that it wouldn't be the ic. Also with school and such time has been a little issue. Also I did not actually get them until Jan 6.
 

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