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looking for a network usb hub

jack0987

Member
I have a belkin network usb hub but it will not work with windows 10. I use it for my printer and scanner.

Looking for something similar that will work with windows 98SE (optional), windows xp, windows 7, and windows 10.
A 4 computer usb switch would work with all 4 OSes but there would be a lot more connecting wires.

Please offer suggestions.
 

Visitor

Well-Known Member
I just used a Raspberry Pi Zero W ($10) to create a print server using CUPS. Following this article, Use a Raspberry PI Zero W as a Wireless Print Server, it was pretty simple to set up. Adding a USB hub allows it to support more than one printer.

I haven't tried this, but it looks like adding scanner support wouldn't be too difficult. Printing And Scanning From a Distance With Raspberry Pi and Your Old USP Printer.

A Raspberry Pi Zero W, the "official" case, a micro-USB To Go cable and an SD card and you could quickly have a stylish, compact, highly customizable solution for less than $25.

 

jack0987

Member
I just used a Raspberry Pi Zero W ($10) to create a print server using CUPS. Following this article, Use a Raspberry PI Zero W as a Wireless Print Server, it was pretty simple to set up. Adding a USB hub allows it to support more than one printer.

I haven't tried this, but it looks like adding scanner support wouldn't be too difficult. Printing And Scanning From a Distance With Raspberry Pi and Your Old USP Printer.

A Raspberry Pi Zero W, the "official" case, a micro-USB To Go cable and an SD card and you could quickly have a stylish, compact, highly customizable solution for less than $25.


Thank you for the reply. I will study up on this.
 

jack0987

Member
For now, a ABCD switch would be easy for me to do partly because I already have one mostly built as an experiment for another project.

However, some information would be helpful.

Near as I can see, The two data wires need to be a twisted pair. Please comment.

Also, what if I wanted to run the wires on a circuit board? How would one twist the wires on a circuit board?
 

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
For now, a ABCD switch would be easy for me to do partly because I already have one mostly built as an experiment for another project.

However, some information would be helpful.

Near as I can see, The two data wires need to be a twisted pair. Please comment.

Also, what if I wanted to run the wires on a circuit board? How would one twist the wires on a circuit board?
They don't - your premise is wrong - unless your PCB is 100 feet long?.
 

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
Do you mean that the traces of the data lines just run along side of one another?
Yes, the twisting is simply a function of a cable, that's all. It's to prevent crosstalk, and each pair of wires has a different twist to help crosstalk between pairs.

On a PCB it might be a good idea to insert a ground track between them?.
 

jack0987

Member
Yes, the twisting is simply a function of a cable, that's all. It's to prevent crosstalk, and each pair of wires has a different twist to help crosstalk between pairs.

On a PCB it might be a good idea to insert a ground track between them?.

Once, I made a PCB where the data traces were about 3 inches long running side by side. It did not work.

So, you think putting a ground trace between them will solve the problem?
 

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