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How to create multiple simultaneous signal sources from a single reference source?

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John Manuel

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I wanted to build a circuit which would produce a set of signals of different frequencies in different channels simultaneously using a single reference source. I also want the frequencies to be changeable. I am looking to generate frequencies in kHz and MHz range. On searching on the web I came across PLL. I wanted to know if I can do it using PLL or any other methods. It should be fully analog.
 

ronsimpson

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
It should be fully analog.
why?
A phase lock loop is not fully analog.
generate frequencies in kHz and MHz range.
unclear; 1mhz? 10mhz, 100mhz, 999mhz Please pick a range.

How will you set the frequency? Knob? Keyboard? from a PC?
How to set the frequency? I have a box that outputs numbers like 1mhz, 2mhz, 3mhz, .... 8mhz, 9mhz, 10, 20, 30, 40 .....
I also have a box where I can output 10,000,000hz or 10,000,001hz or 10,000,002hz
using a single reference source.
Like a crystal reference?
 
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John Manuel

New Member
why?
A phase lock loop is not fully analog.
I do not know much about PLL. I just wanted to design a circuit which works in the analog domain with no Analog to Digital Conversions so that latency would be minimal. I need quick responses.
unclear; 1mhz? 10mhz, 100mhz, 999mhz Please pick a range.
Range = 1Hz till 100KHz (for now)
How will you set the frequency? Knob? Keyboard? from a PC?
I guess through a knob. I do not want any Analog to Digital Conversions.
Like a crystal reference?
Yes.

I need frequencies that are multiples like 2, 4, 8, 16,...

Thank You very much for your reply. I am terribly sorry for my blunt post.
 

ronsimpson

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Here is an example. 2.4576 reference. S1 is a switch to select what output frequency. Look at the output frequency; there is a divide by 2 between for each pin.

In side the 4060 is a oscillator (top left) then a long line of divide by 2. Unfortunately not all frequencies are brought out. So you might think about the CD4040 and CD4020 which does have all the frequencies come out but does not have the oscillator.

The CD4060 has a brother (75HC4060) which works at 5 volts and is much faster.
----edited----
That circuit does divide by 2, divide by 2 ........ = 2,4,8,16,32,64,128,256,512,.....
There is another one that divides by 2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10 only.
 

schmitt trigger

Well-Known Member
To Ron's very useful circuit, I would also add a resistor (100k is ok) from IC2's pin 3 to either ground or Vdd. Pin 4 is already at Vdd so that would be very convenient.
Such that the pin is not left floating in case S1's very first switch is selected.
 
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