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Hello (Introduction and some devices enquiries)

Asheekay

New Member
Hi all.

I am Asheekay, a man from Pakistan. I am interested in electronics and have some idea about DLD (digital logic and design), studying it in one of the semesters in the college. However, I am generally ignorant about practical electronics applications.

For a start, I would like to know about relays. How many types of relays are there and from what range (as in, what is the minimum switching voltage for the smallest relay and how much power can it turn on). Also, how many types of relays are there?

Is there any useful link which I should read to get informed about them?
 

tvtech

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Hi and welcome to ETO :)

Try this link for starters 5VDC 2A miniature PCB relay:

 

ronsimpson

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
DigiKey.com
Try the link above. Go to any company that sales electronics parts. Search for relays. DigiKey has 8 groups of relays covering 20,000 relays.
Examples: "automotive relays" are for 12 to 15 volts at high current and high vibration.
RF relays are for high frequencies.
Reed relays are small and usually low power.
Contactors are very large, high voltage, high current.
There are solid state relays with no moving parts.

DigiKey also has a way to search for the right type of relay. example: Input voltage =12, Switch current 10 to 20 amp, Switch voltage <=100 volts. Fill out the form and see how may will work.
Good luck and ask more questions.
 

hyedenny

Active Member
How many types of relays are there and from what range (as in, what is the minimum switching voltage for the smallest relay and how much power can it turn on). Also, how many types of relays are there?
You may also want to consider contactors. They are essentially the same as relays -- electromagnetic switches -- but are used when switching over approximately 20a and 240v.
If you can find electro-tech-online, I'm sure you're capable of finding information online about relays.
 

Asheekay

New Member
If you can find electro-tech-online, I'm sure you're capable of finding information online about relays.
The internet is full of information about relays. I know what they are (in principle).

Thing is, the it's hard to find information about specific relays which sound interesting e.g. very low voltage/current relays (if there are any). Relays with two channels etc.
 

tvtech

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
That's the link I gave you.

5VDC miniature relay. So... what else do you need know ?
 

tvtech

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Ok..wait...two channels?
If you're looking for pretty relays...that are interesting..... I've not found one yet. Relays are boring.
 

JimB

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member

rjenkinsgb

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Thing is, the it's hard to find information about specific relays which sound interesting e.g. very low voltage/current relays (if there are any). Relays with two channels etc.
Have a look through the links here:

After selecting one of the classifications, you can set ranges of parameters such as operating voltage, number of contacts, contact voltage or current ratings etc. to find parts you are interested in.

Once you go to a specific item, eg.

you can get usually find the datasheet for that relay in the "technical reference" block.


This is probably one of the more unusual ones, rated to switch signals down to a few millivolts and the coil is also very low power:
 

JimB

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
Clickity clack, clickity clack. Like a train on a track. Light on light off. Click.
Oh dear, what can I say?

Who could fail to be impressed by these two relays?

RF Relays 1.JPGRF Relays 2.JPG

Like a train on a track.
Railways you want?
How about this:

French Loco.JPG

Well, I think that it is impressive.

Sorry for the thread hijack.

JimB
 

Asheekay

New Member

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