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Generator

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Tuck3rz

New Member
How do you determine the voltage of the generator?

I m suppose to produce electricity by doing a bicycle generator but i m not sure what voltage generator should i use and why.
Anyone can help me?
 

birdman0_o

Active Member
The voltage will depend on the flux and amount of coils if you want to look at it from a mathematical perspective. If you want to look at it on the quantitative side, in an ideal situation, a 24V motor can produce 24V while being turned at the RPM it would normally spin at when attached to a 24V power source. This is for DC motors of course, you could also look into Stepper motors.
 

Sceadwian

Banned
Spin the motor shaft... measure the voltage produced under load....
 

Sceadwian

Banned
That topic has been covered on the forums multiple times and the information is easily searchable on Google.
 

birdman0_o

Active Member
It would be a bit more complicated than your simplification. You would need to maintain over 13.8V to charge a lead acid battery. 12V would essential be its peak voltage. If it were up to me I'd use a 24V motor with a 12V lead acid battery, and would gear the motor to ouput ~14.5-15V.

What is going to be turning the motor?
 

Tuck3rz

New Member
a bicycle which is used to turn the generator and it is connected to a charge controller then to a 12volt lead acid battery
 

Tuck3rz

New Member
alternatively, the generator is also connected to a series of LED and 7-segment to show the amount of voltage produce by the user. it is programmed by virtual instrument, some sort of interactive games to show students who is able to produce more voltage
 

Tuck3rz

New Member
sorry. i m not good explaining in my english this is the flow chart
9015-FlowChart.jpg
 

birdman0_o

Active Member
Sounds awesome! Ive been wanting to do something like this :) But haven't had the money for an inverter or the batteries or the bicycle to mod XD.

I'll gladly try to figure this out with you along the way :)

Do you have any microcontroller experience? Any electrical experience?
 

Tuck3rz

New Member
i m from currently studying electrical engineering
i have learnt micro controller but still figuring out how do it really works
 

Tuck3rz

New Member
hey.. If i use a 28Ah battery, how do i determine the rating of the charge controller?
And if so, would a 24V,8A,1800rpm generator be appropiate
 

mneary

New Member
hey.. If i use a 28Ah battery, how do i determine the rating of the charge controller?
If you think the generator might produce 8A, then the charge controller should be this much, plus a safety margin. 8A would charge a 28AH battery in around 3 hours.
And if so, would a 24V,8A,1800rpm generator be appropiate
24V, 8A is about 1/3 horsepower. Your charge controller would need to be designed to manage the burden (demanding less power). Some athletes can generate that much power, but you can ask them not to.

If your "bicycle" rider is achieving a virtual 10mph, that's around 50 to 100 rpm. A "1800rpm" generator would need to have some gearing (some of this can be done in electronics). Beware of losses in gears and chains.
 

Tuck3rz

New Member
Does anyone have a schemetic of a charge controller which does not use PV but a voltage regulator ... i m not really sure how it goes, but definelty not using charge contoller with a solar source
 
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