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Ferrite Cores

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Njguy

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Does anyone know where I can buy ferrite cores/rods, roughly 1 inch in diameter by 3 inches long? Nobody seems to sell them which is really strange considering how abundant Iron is.
 
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Njguy

Member
Ferrite does not make good electromagnets. It's good for high frequency coils and transformers though.
Well then do you have a suggestion as to what is because I am pretty sure that ferrite is the standard.
 
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crutschow

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Ferrite is a standard for high frequency magnetics, but is not "the standard". It has low magnetic permeability, so it not good if you want a high magnetic field electromagnet.

For DC electromagnets a soft, high permeability material is normally used, such as iron or various nickel-iron alloys.
 

Njguy

Member
Ferrite is a standard for high frequency magnetics, but is not "the standard". It has low magnetic permeability, so it not good if you want a high magnetic field electromagnet.

For DC electromagnets a soft, high permeability material is normally used, such as iron or various nickel-iron alloys.

You do realize that Ferrite is pure Iron don't you? That's why Iron is Fe on the periodic table. You can't get softer iron than pure ferrite.
 
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Njguy

Member
Ok, I got what you guys are saying. A hard ferrite is preferable over soft. But nonetheless, ferrite = iron. Also if its too hard, it retains magnetism, which is bad for electromagnets when you need them to turn off.
 
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Njguy

Member
Thanks to both of you, you really help. Just a quick question, what if you used an actual ferrite magnet as the core? Would it be really strong when you turn it on? And when it's off, it would go back to normal strength I assume.
 

crutschow

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Most Helpful Member
You do realize that Ferrite is pure Iron don't you? That's why Iron is Fe on the periodic table. You can't get softer iron than pure ferrite.
In normal engineering use of the term, when magnetics are referred to as ferrite, it means they are made from various magnetic iron compounds. Thus your ferrite rods are unlikely to be pure iron.

Fe is short for the latin ferrum.
 

Njguy

Member
In normal engineering use of the term, when magnetics are referred to as ferrite, it means they are made from various magnetic iron compounds. Thus your ferrite rods are unlikely to be pure iron.

Fe is short for the latin ferrum.

Ok, I gotcha
 

Njguy

Member
Not to bother you guys anymore, but if you look at the link i gave you, there is a ferrite core that has 2,000μ permeability. I'm sure it must be better than the dura-bar I'm using. But I also noticed that electrical steel has a permeability of around 4,000μ. Is there point where permeability gets too high?
 

smanches

New Member
Don't they use the ferrite powder to make inductor cores because it has a better "magnetic elasticity"? As in it won't turn into a magnet itself as easily as pure iron does?

For an electromagnet, I doubt there is too much permeability.
 

crutschow

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
They use ferrite powder at higher frequencies, mainly because it has a high electrical resistance, unlike iron alloys, and thus very low eddy current loss, which is proportional to frequency.

Reducing eddy current loss is the reason they laminate iron power transformer cores with an insulating layer between the laminations.
 
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