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Electrical leading grease

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SimonTHK

Member
Hello
I am looking for some grease that is leading electricity. I want to protect my connections, but it has to be with electrical leaded grease.

What is best used for this, any suggestions?

Best regards Simon
 

MaxHeadRoom78

Well-Known Member
Leaded Grease?
Would Dielectric grease be OK, you can get it from auto supply stores, used for moisture prevention etc on HV system.
Max.
 

JimB

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Tony Stewart

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Conductive grease might be graphite,,copper or silver dust in silicone or lithium grease
 

dr pepper

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If its corrosion protection your looking for then I use RS components silicone grease on mobile plant equipment.
Stability over time is an important factor for this application.
 

MrAl

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Hi,

I use quality silicone grease for various electronic connection needs as well as for, well, he he, bug control.

However, I absolutely MUST state though that i HIGHLY CONDEMN the use of CRC brand silicone grease. Actually it may be the spray not the grease.
The problem with this PARTICULAR brand is that it can be very harmful to some plastics. There may be other brands too that are not good for electrical work.

I guess the main thing to look for is if it says RIGHT ON THE CAN "safe for plastics" then it's ok. But if it states only one or two types of plastics i'd stay away from it. For example, the CRC can says "safe for nylon" but that's it. It turns out that it creates blotches on some plastics and may ecen be worse for other types of plastics.

Dielectric grease is made for electronics, but not all silicone greases are, and i am not sure if all types that are called "Dielectric Grease" are safe for plastics. The only way to be sure is if it says it right on the can that it is safe for plastics, and not just some specific plastic(s).
CRC may in fact make another type of silicone grease that is actually called "Dielectric Gease" and that one may be ok, but i have no personal experience with that one. They also may make other types that are actually ok for plastics, but it will state that on the package.

I'd say "test on a small area first" but i dont know how long it takes to actually see the damaging effects. Could be a day, a week, a month, or a year.

Oh yeah, the 'bad' ones contain some sort of petroleum distillates.
 
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dr pepper

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Interesting Mr Al, I spose all chemical compounds need consideration.

Where I work use spray silicone release agent, a bit of work was done to ensure it was compatible with the product and food regulations and also other chemic's we use as part of production, despite this there was still and accident, being a papermill static is a problem, and it causes sparks, the propellant in the cans was combustible, when someone sprayed the stuff in a confined space it flashed up, fortunately not causing injuries, now we have compressed air powered fixed sprayers.
 

MaxHeadRoom78

Well-Known Member
I have used Permatex Automotive Silicone Dielectric Grease for some years for many electrical applications and never had a problem with insulation types.
Max.
 

shortbus=

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However, I absolutely MUST state though that i HIGHLY CONDEMN the use of CRC brand silicone grease
They may have changed the formula now but ~ 10 years ago I bought some CRC contact cleaner spray. To use on a radio volume control, bad move on my part. The pot was made of plastic and the spray totally destroyed the volume control. Instead of "static" from it it wouldn't work at all after the 'cleaning'. :(
 

dr pepper

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Now you mention that I seem to remember using a switchcleaner, probably a uk one and the slide switch I used it on ended up with its plastic parts fused together and was basically then a one position switch.
 

MrAl

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Hi,

Oh yes some interesting stories. When i first started using this stuff i had no idea there were different kinds i thought they were all the same.

I have some Permatex dielectric grease too but have not tried that one yet.
I am getting the overall impression after starting this thread that if they are called "dielectric grease" then they are ok. Cant be 100 percent sure yet, but that is what it is starting to look like.
 

SimonTHK

Member
I wanted it to be conductive. But maybe I dont want that anyway. Maybe I just want it to keep corrosion away, so the contact´s keep being clean. Though... the problem is actually, that the contact´s are taken on and of frequently, switching batteries, using quick contact´s not bolt´s. Also wearing out the contact´s contact part´s.

So I guess I still want conductive, none corrosive grease.
 

Tony Stewart

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
if the grease bridges high voltage, the grease must be clean and a good insulator.
battery terminals must be air tight but oil prevents outer surface corrosion. but insides must not be contaminated.
 
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