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Creating a wireless power switch

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mb83

New Member
Hi all,
Im a newbie to the site but have had a browse around and got some great info on here.
The reason for signing up is im undertaking a small project and need some ideas/advice on how best to go about it.

The idea is i this. I have a motorbike which has no ignition barrel due to it being wrecked previously. So what i currently have is a switch set up to give me main power and light's power.
What i want to creat is a wireless switch to activate the main power BEFORE those 2 switches.
Now i see the easiest way of this is to get hold of a car Central locking unit and use that as the Wireless receiver, but as far as im aware this only send's a pulse when activated.
Looking into it i think i would need to send this pulse to a latching relay or possibley an impule relay?

As the power through the relay would need to stay continuously on until switched off rather then pulsing open and closed.

does that make sense?

Apart from that i have no idea, i dont really know what a latching relay is or how to wire one up, hence why im here :D .

Any advice/info or other ideas on how to get the same effect would be greatly appreciated

Mike :)
 
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crutschow

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
I assume this is to provide an ignition lock.

One type of latching relay has two coils. You pulse one coil to latch the relay and pulse the other coil to release the relay. You could power the coils from two of the signals from a car remote (lock and unlock). You may need a transistor to amplify the signal from the remote receiver to power the relay coil. Don't forget to add a diode across the relay coil to suppress the inductive spike from the relay coil.
 

mb83

New Member
I assume this is to provide an ignition lock.

One type of latching relay has two coils. You pulse one coil to latch the relay and pulse the other coil to release the relay. You could power the coils from two of the signals from a car remote (lock and unlock). You may need a transistor to amplify the signal from the remote receiver to power the relay coil. Don't forget to add a diode across the relay coil to suppress the inductive spike from the relay coil.
Hi,
Yes basically due to the actual key being useless this would work as the key, allowing the power through to the ignition switch and the light's.
Until i receive the control unit i wont know exactly how it power's , Ie using 2 seperate pulse lines or just the one.

What do you mean by inductive spike ? Would i need to fit the diode in line of both connections or just the singular?

Oh and looking into it further it seems an impulse relay would be my best bet as it only requires one power source to switch in either direction. If i have understood correctly

As i say im a novice when it comes to most electronic's especially trying to create these types of unit. But its all about trying :)
 
Last edited:

crutschow

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
The relay coil has inductance which generates a voltage spike when the coil is switched, which can blow any semiconductor device driving it. You can suppress it by connecting a small diode directly in parallel across each relay coil (cathode to positive coil connection), not in series with the coil.

If you only have a single pulse output from your remote, then you could use an impulse relay. You could add an LED light on the relay output to tell you when the power was on to your system if you don't have any other indication.
 

mb83

New Member
The relay coil has inductance which generates a voltage spike when the coil is switched, which can blow any semiconductor device driving it. You can suppress it by connecting a small diode directly in parallel across each relay coil (cathode to positive coil connection), not in series with the coil.

If you only have a single pulse output from your remote, then you could use an impulse relay. You could add an LED light on the relay output to tell you when the power was on to your system if you don't have any other indication.
Ah ok i get you now.
Was considering an LED in the loop somewhere to show on/off , was thinking could mount it in one of the clocks.
Well will hopefulyl be collecting the Car unit early next week so will find out if its a single or double pulse, although looking at the prices of impulse relays im hoping its a duel pulse lol.
 
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