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Ceiling fan speed controller

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JMW

Member
I have several ceiling fans with capacitor speed controllers. The switch is 4 position. There are 2 capacitors 1 of which is 250 VAC at 12ufd. Other nomenclature is 0622(115,122). The other cap is 6ufd at 250VAC. The 12 ufd has expanded noticeably. It seems as if the positions are Off, Slow 6ufd, Med 12ufd and Hi both 6 and 12. One controller works fine, the other has failed twice, both times the 12ufd has expanded.
First, the one that has failed twice operates 24/7 the other only several hrs a day.
Can anyone point to a replacement 12ufd for a reasonable amount of money.
The cap appears to be paper. It is 1" W x 1 1/4"L x 5/8" H (25mmW x 31mm L x 15mm H)
H can increase to 20 mm.

Thanks,

Jim
 

JMW

Member
They add capacitance in series to the motor. This reduces the speed. My original post had a mistake. Hi is straight through, med has one cap and low the other.
I'm in the process of making a schematic.
 

canadaelk

Active Member
It is a permanent-split capacitor motor, strictly AC, common use in fans. You should be able to ge the C at shops that repair small appliances. E
 

KeepItSimpleStupid

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Here is my source of ceiling fan parts: http://www.ceilingfanparts.com/images/capacitor.htm

One of the caps might be the wrong value, the motor itself could be bad (shorted winding) or the switch could have some resistance in it. I'd check those possibilities. Also check to make sure the fan spins free.

Note that in these motors, one winding has a slightly different resistance on purpose.

There may be a way of figuring out what the capacitance has to be, but you would need a way to measure Z and probably Z and the DC Resistance of the windings. I think what you want is to be able to shift the phase by 180 degrees on the other winding and you can basically figure that out.

There should be enough info here: http://www.electro-tech-online.com/custompdfs/2012/05/ac_trig.pdf
 

JMW

Member
Thanks guys.
The parts are clearly labeled. The shorted winding makes sense. I have 3 of these. They were originally installed without the controller(s). Two fans, ran at the same speed, the 3rd much faster. This '3rd" fan is the only one that works properly and the controller works. Currently 1 fan has no controller and spins slowly, the 3rd one cause the cap to blow out. I'm still working on the schematic.
 

KeepItSimpleStupid

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
In the normal sense, the switch selects 1 cap, then the other cap and one in parallel. The parallel one, or the highest capacitance, is the highest speed.
 

unclejed613

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
or is it possible that the caps are wired to the wrong winding?
 

atferrari

Well-Known Member
Hello, what is your experience when buying a ceiling fan. Can you share?
Thanks.
Had to pay for them after choosing the models in the showroom.
 

MaxHeadRoom78

Well-Known Member
Ensure they are capacitor run caps, I purchase N.A. made versions as the Chinese type do not last, one manuf that electronic stores sell is made by CDE.
Max.
 
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