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Can't find online datasheet for IC rd8p01cs1002

rjenkinsgb

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
That's probably an in-house number; the device makers own part number.
From what I can see it could be a pre-programmed MCU made for a specific company?
(Or that could be a coincidence with the number).

Can you provide more information on the thing it is used in & some photos of the part and overall circuit board?
 

rjcamatos

New Member
First tanks for reply.
Its Black Decker toaster machine.
I attach the photos....
 

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Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
First tanks for reply.
Its Black Decker toaster machine.
I attach the photos....
As already suggested, it's almost certainly a pre-programmed micro-controller, and an in-house number, so no data sheet (which wouldn't help anyway, as any datasheet would just be for the blank device). It's also fairly unlikely to be faulty, micro-controllers are incredibly reliable.
 

rjcamatos

New Member
The toaster its already working fine, it was not a fault of the MCU, but i would like to analise the circuit, and the part Im missing is the MCU pinout and the datasheet to take a look at eletric parameters and pin types.
 

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Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
The toaster its already working fine, it was not a fault of the MCU, but i would like to analise the circuit, and the part Im missing is the MCU pinout and the datasheet to take a look at eletric parameters and pin types.
It should be fairly simple to work out - you have Vdd, Vss, Reset (these should be easy to locate) - and the rest are likely to be I/O pins. If there's a crystal or ceramic filter, those will connect to the oscillator pins, but it's likely to be using an internal oscillator (for cost reasons).
 

rjenkinsgb

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
The MCU is very likely a Samsung / IXYS S3FS24, S28 or another from the same series.

There are not many MCUs with pin 1 ground and pin 20 power.
The reset cap from pin 1 to pin 4 fits with that part.

Data here:

A lot of PICs use 1 & 20 for power and have reset on 4, but 1 & 20 are reversed; the reset cap would not work if connected to power.
 

rjcamatos

New Member
It should be fairly simple to work out - you have Vdd, Vss, Reset (these should be easy to locate) - and the rest are likely to be I/O pins. If there's a crystal or ceramic filter, those will connect to the oscillator pins, but it's likely to be using an internal oscillator (for cost reasons).
Ok, need to check out later, but i think it recive on vin 230V, then it's retified to half wave DC, there are no Transformers.
 

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
Ok, need to check out later, but i think it recive on vin 230V, then it's retified to half wave DC, there are no Transformers.

Post a picture of the other side of the board, it probably uses a capacitive dropper to drop the mains down to 5V or whatever. This means the entire circuit is live to the mains.
 

rjcamatos

New Member
Post a picture of the other side of the board, it probably uses a capacitive dropper to drop the mains down to 5V or whatever. This means the entire circuit is live to the mains.
Already Assembled, but on the order side ot realy have some capacitors and a potencimeter.
Can you explain me what is a capacitive dropper?
In simple terms?
 

rjcamatos

New Member
Already Assembled, but on the order side ot realy have some capacitors and a potencimeter.
Can you explain me what is a capacitive dropper?
In simple terms?
The toaster have a resistance of 4ohmios then that is direct input voltage to the board the oder connection its only an L but no direct connection to main power. It's prupose is to Simple make a magnético filde to grab the toaster to on position it acta like a relay...
 

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
Already Assembled, but on the order side ot realy have some capacitors and a potencimeter.
Can you explain me what is a capacitive dropper?
In simple terms?
It's simply using a capacitor to drop the mains down to a low voltage, in place of a large (and very hot) resistor.


However, it 'might' be that the toaster element is used as a large resistor to power the PCB.
 

atferrari

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Ricardhinho
Please, whatever pictures you take next time, get them in focus. Most phone cameras can get good quality pictures.
 

rjcamatos

New Member
Ok tank you, next time i open the toaster i will analise more carfully the circuit.

You help me a lot ::)))

Best Regards,
Ricardo Matos.
Ok, in this image you can already see how the 5V is generated with an input voltage of 11V. I thought the input voltage was 230V, but I wondered: what if the toaster is inductive and not resistive? So, it may be that the 11V comes directly from the heating element, taking advantage of the inductor to create a transformer from that! The result is exactly what happens, the 11V is generated using the inductor element of the toaster, working as a kind of transformer, causing the current that passes through the inductor that heats up to generate a voltage in a secondary that is in parallel with the heating element.
 

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rjcamatos

New Member
Ok, in this image you can already see how the 5V is generated with an input voltage of 11V. I thought the input voltage was 230V, but I wondered: what if the toaster is inductive and not resistive? So, it may be that the 11V comes directly from the heating element, taking advantage of the inductor to create a transformer from that! The result is exactly what happens, the 11V is generated using the inductor element of the toaster, working as a kind of transformer, causing the current that passes through the inductor that heats up to generate a voltage in a secondary that is in parallel with the heating element.
By the way this is an Black& Decker Model MXTO1001E
 

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
Ok, in this image you can already see how the 5V is generated with an input voltage of 11V. I thought the input voltage was 230V, but I wondered: what if the toaster is inductive and not resistive? So, it may be that the 11V comes directly from the heating element, taking advantage of the inductor to create a transformer from that! The result is exactly what happens, the 11V is generated using the inductor element of the toaster, working as a kind of transformer, causing the current that passes through the inductor that heats up to generate a voltage in a secondary that is in parallel with the heating element.

I would say that's EXTREMELY unlikely, and it simply uses the element as a resistive dropper - there's very little inductance in a toaster element. And as you're wanting it to get hot, there's no issues with the huge power loss in such a dropper.

As you're wanting to analyse the circuit, I would suggest your first priority is to draw it out, so you've got a diagram rather than just a picture, it's a simple circuit, and should be easy to do.

A good tip for doing so, is don't expect to complete it in one attempt, it usually takes a number of attempts and modifications until you get an accurate (and easily read) diagram - for the first attempt don't worry about transistors etc. been upside down or at funny angles, the second attempt (based on the first) allows you to correct those problems.
 

rjenkinsgb

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
I believe the electronic ones generally have the "latch" solenoid in series with the elements.

There will be a relatively small voltage across that, once the main switch closes when the mechanism is operated. Presumably that's where the controller is powered from.

The release could be either a series electronic switch that is on from power-up, or even simpler, it could short the solenoid to release it.
 

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