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Bob Pease laid off?

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Willbe

New Member
I was wondering when that would happen. He survived quite a long time.
 

Speakerguy

Active Member
Job security seems ****. My brother has been with TI for about a decade, and has narrowly survived two layoffs.

I've personally never been laid off. But I've been through one. It happened my second week with the Cirrus Logic. They didn't give any notice. The guy in the cube next to me boxed up his stuff and left on the 7th day I officially worked there. Little did I know that I had been hired to replace him. Everyone at the company regardless of time employed there was given 2 weeks salary instead of the usual 2 weeks + 1 week for every year worked there. One guy had been with the company twenty years.

I ended up leaving the company after 3 months, but there were other reasons involved with that decision.

My other brother is an attorney. The economy is hitting them hard too. There is a shortage of work to go around. What happens to them? No layoffs, but they have to pay for their own parking now. Firing one associate out of a huge law firm could have payed for everyone's parking, but they didn't do that.

It would be nice if engineers were treated like that, instead of like cattle.
 

3v0

Coop Build Coordinator
Forum Supporter
Engineering job security is not as good as it used to be, but it is still one of the better professions. The people I know who have been laid off have found new sometimes better jobs.

Some of these have been with small companies started by people who left the biggies.

3v0
 

Roff

Well-Known Member
Job security seems ****. My brother has been with TI for about a decade, and has narrowly survived two layoffs.

I've personally never been laid off. But I've been through one. It happened my second week with the Cirrus Logic. They didn't give any notice. The guy in the cube next to me boxed up his stuff and left on the 7th day I officially worked there. Little did I know that I had been hired to replace him. Everyone at the company regardless of time employed there was given 2 weeks salary instead of the usual 2 weeks + 1 week for every year worked there. One guy had been with the company twenty years.

I ended up leaving the company after 3 months, but there were other reasons involved with that decision.

My other brother is an attorney. The economy is hitting them hard too. There is a shortage of work to go around. What happens to them? No layoffs, but they have to pay for their own parking now. Firing one associate out of a huge law firm could have payed for everyone's parking, but they didn't do that.

It would be nice if engineers were treated like that, instead of like cattle.
I worked as a tech at IBM while I was going to school (this was almost 50 year ago). Job security was one of their big selling points at the time. In my very first engineering job interview, at a small company, I asked about job security. The engineer who was interviewing me said, "I can't promise you that your job is secure, but your best job security is the ability to find another job. After you've worked here for a year, you will have no problem finding another job.".
I'm 68 and retired now, and he was right. I have had a number of jobs, and I was never involuntarily out of work except for one time, and that was only for a few weeks. I did operate under the assumption that, if layoffs were imminent, I could lose my job, and I also recognized that it is a lot easier to find another job if you are currently employed, so I would bail if I got too nervous.
Electronics companies have to show a profit. Most have stockholders to answer to. I suspect most law firms operate with a higher profit margin than electronics companies, and most are privately held, so they don't have to worry about stockholders.
 
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tcmtech

Banned
Most Helpful Member
Same here. I have been in a number of jobs myself. I learned self suficiency at a young working age. I never trust employers. Last hired first layed off.
It never seemed right to me to see the good people go just because some dumbass has been there longer or has no marketable skills and the company knows he will go under if he looses his job. But thats how it works I guess.
 

duffy

Well-Known Member
Bob Pease is a real guy? I always thought he was a myth. Like eskimos.
 

tcmtech

Banned
Most Helpful Member
Never heard off him. What did bob do that was so great? Honest question!
 

Omar.M

Member
Never heard off him. What did bob do that was so great? Honest question!
Wikipedia told me the following:
Bob Pease is an analog integrated circuit design expert. He has designed several very successful integrated circuits, many of them in continuous production for multiple decades. These include the LM331 voltage to frequency converter, and the LM317 adjustable voltage regulator.

[...]

Pease started work in the early 1960s at George A. Philbrick Researches (GAP-R). GAP-R pioneered the first reasonable-cost, mass-produced op amp: the K2-W. At GAP-R, Pease developed many high-performance op amps, built with discrete solid-state components.
Ref: Bob Pease - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
To be honest, all I know of him is what is stated on that Wiki article. Not even sure if that is accurate ;).
 
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Roff

Well-Known Member
Bob Pease is one of the pre-eminent analog circuit design wizards alive today.
Check out Pease Porridge, a magazine column he has been writing for years.
 

Willbe

New Member
If I were to do the career choice again, and if I chose EE again, I would have taken courses in political science, gotten a lifelong second [part time] job in an unrelated field and become an EE consultant.

You wouldn't believe some of the stuff I saw in industry.
 
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tcmtech

Banned
Most Helpful Member
I belive you.
I often tell people half of the true love of being self employed is just seeing what someone does next and then calls me to ask why it went wrong! If you read my post on the crazy multimeter or my short stories on common sense or saftey first, you would have gotten just a glimpse of what I have seen too!

Still wake up smiling everyday! How many can say that about their job?
 
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