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are all RCA connectors the same?

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yolo

New Member
I am working on a project from Science buddies -Radon_detector. RCA phono jack connector is mentioned in the materials required. They've referred to this one. Now I wanna know whether my DVD player's phono connector can be used or not. If not, Which type should I buy?
 

gophert

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
I am working on a project from Science buddies -Radon_detector. RCA phono jack connector is mentioned in the materials required. They've referred to this one. Now I wanna know whether my DVD player's phono connector can be used or not. If not, Which type should I buy?
They are a standard size.
 

audioguru

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
It is probably OK but the ad says the manufacturer is Jameco Valuepro and the datasheet says Goldsun which is probably a different Chinese company.
Do you trust Chinese parts? Does it really have a nickel plating or will it have unplated brass or tin that will soon corrode?

I usually use trusted and quality Switchcraft parts like that.
 

yolo

New Member
I am not going to buy from Jameco nor the Chinese company. ima probably rip one off from an old DVD player or buy from an offline shop. So that ain't a problem, So can I go with any RCA phono pin? audioguru
 

gophert

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
I am not going to buy from Jameco nor the Chinese company. ima probably rip one off from an old DVD player or buy from an offline shop. So that ain't a problem, So can I go with any RCA phono pin? audioguru
Yes, left, right, video, digital audio, subwoofer, or the data port on the side of the EXOCOMP from Star Trek - all the same - just different color insulators.
 

dr pepper

Well-Known Member
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I've seen & used lots of phono (as they are called in the Uk) connectors & never found one doesnt fit another.
Interesting techlib page, I see they used a darlington instead of a fet, maybe for electrostatic reasons.
 

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
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I've seen & used lots of phono (as they are called in the Uk) connectors & never found one doesnt fit another.
Interesting techlib page, I see they used a darlington instead of a fet, maybe for electrostatic reasons.
More likely simply using what they had - and FET's are still relatively rare and little used (compared with bipolar).

As you say though, Phono sockets are a standard item.
 

crutschow

Well-Known Member
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It's interesting how far back that connector goes.
My folk's had a Farnsworth console radio, built in the late 1930's, that had a "phono" RCA input.
I remember them buying a 78 record changer that plugged into the radio to listen to the old 78 shellacs.
Below is a picture of the chassis with the RCA jack just below the red label:
A modern RCA plug would plug in perfectly.

 

audioguru

Well-Known Member
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The RCA connector is a little older than me. European audio products used DIN connectors.
In those days I also remember a phono that had a black thing spinning around and around making click, pop, click and pop sounds.
 

gophert

Well-Known Member
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It's interesting how far back that connector goes.
My folk's had a Farnsworth console radio, built in the late 1930's, that had a "phono" RCA input.
I remember them buying a 78 record changer that plugged into the radio to listen to the old 78 shellacs.
Below is a picture of the chassis with the RCA jack just below the red label:
A modern RCA plug would plug in perfectly.

Your label shows model BC-80.

Here is the link to the brochure and schematic...
https://www.radiomuseum.org/r/farnsworth_bc80.html

It claims 1940/41 but the database has lots of errors on date ranges.
 

sagor1

Active Member
Just a note, the DVD RCA jack may be insulated, you have to be sure to wire the ground as well as the signal line. The jack you show also has a ground lug, but that jack is also generally grounded by the nut holding it against the chassis.
No real different overall, just this note that the ground must be wired and not to rely on any chassis ground. That said, some DVD jacks may indeed be grounded by a fastening nut as well, it all depends on the design of the RCA jacks in the device...
 
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