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3 phase syncrho's

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gary350

Well-Known Member
I took aircraft electronic in college. 400 hz vs 60 hz or 50 hz are smaller and lighter weight. Reduced weight and smaller size is much better for airplane where weight and size are a big deal.
 

dr pepper

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Looking at the code its actually difficult to tell whether I'm modulating the cores single phase or the stators 3 phases.

Synchro's are old hat now I spose, resolvers their cousin are still in use, toyota are one using them in their latest hybrid vehicles.
 

mbarazeen

Member
1st time I hear about this transmitter, interesting. If I correctly understand Its kind of 3 phase generator with oscillating exciter, the center core (rotor) does not infect rotate.
 

dr pepper

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
You nearly right.
The rotor is excited by ac and it rotates, this produces 3 phases of ac, the amplitude and whether the shift is 0 or 180 degrees of each phase depends on the position of the rotor.
Its a old way of transmitting a shaft position.
The transmitter and receiver are essentially the same, power is applied to both rotors, and the 3 phases of each connected together.
 

mbarazeen

Member
You nearly right.
The rotor is excited by ac and it rotates, this produces 3 phases of ac, the amplitude and whether the shift is 0 or 180 degrees of each phase depends on the position of the rotor.
Its a old way of transmitting a shaft position.
The transmitter and receiver are essentially the same, power is applied to both rotors, and the 3 phases of each connected together.

As I understand from your 1st post that you are trying to use only the indicator without having the transmitter using 3 phase, why cant you try with controlled DC? the rotor can be excited with constant current but all 3 poles of the stator can be excited with controlled DC to make a resultant magnetic field to suit the position to be indicated.
 

dr pepper

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
I sussed it now, but running on DC allthough it would work ends up with a magnetized core causing errors, these units are meant to run on ac.
 
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