• Welcome to our site! Electro Tech is an online community (with over 170,000 members) who enjoy talking about and building electronic circuits, projects and gadgets. To participate you need to register. Registration is free. Click here to register now.

WWV/WWVB RCVR Schematic

Status
Not open for further replies.
Howdy all,
Anybody got a schematic for a WWV or WWVB receiver? I've been told that WWVB doesn't have a voice time report, just data. Since I've never tuned in the station, I don't know if that's true or not. I'm trying to build a digital clock that's controlled by WWVB along with the voice announcement of WWV. If I don't need them both, great, but I'd like to try it my way, first. Because I don't have any programming skills (hate it!), I'd rather not use any micro-pukes. So, anybody got anything that uses straight TTL or CMOS logic stuff? I know I can buy an "atomic" clock for about $15, but that's not the point. I've Googled the life out of this, but I haven't found anything that doesn't use an either an obsolete chip, is already built, is Nixie-tubed, or uses the above mentioned micro- or pic-puke. Any help? Thanks.<ckd>
 

MikeMl

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
I built one using a fast opamp (GBW≈10MHz) following a tuned loop. I could receive the signal from Ft Collins, CO here in Utah day or night. Since they do it inside a wall clock you can buy for $10, there is not much to it :D
 

stevez

Active Member
I purchased an "atomic clock" for $15 locally and read the information provided with the unit. What I recall was that the clock would run un-synchronized most of the time but on the occasion that a signal/data was present the clock would reset/update to the current time. The mfr said that a sufficient signal was likely to be received daily for even a very short period in most areas of the country. As I recall, my clock receive frequency was 60 kHz but my memory may be incorrect.

I think there is a feature on my clock that warns of more than a certain period of time passing since the last update - not sure if it was 24 hrs, 48 hrs or more.
 

Sceadwian

Banned
I wonder if you could receive the 60khz signal directly with an opamp, all you'd need is a loopstick antenna and some filters. By far the WWVB signal is the strongest at 75kw's but that's a data only signal. However the bonus for the 60khz signal is that the frequency of the 60khz carrier wave itself is a frequency standard.

NIST: Time and Frequency Division - Division 847
has all the information.
 

Mikebits

Well-Known Member
If I correctly recall, WWV is transmitted in the HF band at 5,10, and 15 MHz. The modulation is both AM and sideband.

You could always try WWV online:)

http://tf.nist.gov/service/its.htm
 
Last edited:

bigkim100

Banned
I have a clock radio that supposidly sets itself using information provided through the 120v line.
It also has battery back up that allows it to be used without the 120v input, so you can set a bogus time while its running on batteries, then when its plugged in, its actualy kind of cool to watch the unit scream to the correct time.
I have never seen much info on decoding info provided thru the 120v line.
 

MikeMl

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
...
I have never seen much info on decoding info provided thru the 120v line.
The time data isn't coming via the ac power line. The clock radio has a WWVB 60Khz receiver and decoder. It may use the AC line cord as part of the 60KHz antenna.
 
Last edited:

Dean Huster

Well-Known Member
The "atomic clocks" you buy at Wal-Mart for $15 or $20 are truly radio-controlled clocks that typically update when you first install the batteries (at least within an hour of installing the batteries) and after that, update the time only once per day, usually in the wee hours of the morning. I don't know that the receiver can be pulled from the clock for use in other circuits.

You can probably make a better clock by simply using an ovenized crystal for the timebase and then setting the clock via WWVB. WWVB is a better source for time as it's signal isn't affected as much by the ionosphere with otherwise causes major phase shifts in the HF WWV broadcasts. The 60 KHz carrier frequency is derived from the master clocks. However, so are the HF carrier frequecies of WWV at 2.5, 5, 10, 15 and 20 MHZ. That's why you could always used them to zero-beat a shortwave receiver's crystal calibrator.

I doubt that the Wal Mart clocks are much more accurate than 2 or three seconds per day. The updates would cause a mohor shift in time.

The clock receiver in those Wal-Mart clocks may not be able to be run "out of their orignal box) in that they may not be able to receive upon demand.

Dean
 
Status
Not open for further replies.

Latest threads

EE World Online Articles

Loading
Top