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Would like to replace a clothes dryer buzzer. It scares the dog...

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Hello, Our fourth rescue dog used to hunt for the buzzing from our Magic Chef clothes dryer. But now she is scared of it and runs out of the house! I am looking for a place to buy something with a different, more calm sound. Like a chime or musical tone. It is a very old dryer, over 15 years. The buzzer is separate from the electronics board. It is a two prong blade connection. Below is the info on the buzzer.

P.N. 53-167
120v 50-60Hz 7.8W
Intermittent Duty
10%w/max on time
12 sec at 65 degree max
10187-72
9118

Thanks for any help you can provide.
 

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large_ghostman

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silly question, but could you do without one or add a tiny 110V indicator lamp?

Oh and WELCOME to the site
 
silly question, but could you do without one or add a tiny 110V indicator lamp?

Oh and WELCOME to the site
The dryer is in the basement. It would have to be a very bright indicator light to shine through the hardwood into the first floor living area. Hahaha. The buzzer reminds us to get up off our butts and change the wash!

But I was thinking along that line. Run a wire up to a flashing light that we can see on the first floor.

Thanks.
 

gophert

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The dryer is in the basement. It would have to be a very bright indicator light to shine through the hardwood into the first floor living area. Hahaha. The buzzer reminds us to get up off our butts and change the wash!

But I was thinking along that line. Run a wire up to a flashing light that we can see on the first floor.

Thanks.
If it is a standard blade width (like an outlet) you can plug a 5V cell phone charger or 12V adapter into it and find a little sonalert(r) or other low voltage buzzer. The low voltage buzzers are generally much quieter than this old appliance buzzers.

The barrel connector on the low voltage AC to DC adapters can be cut and another type of connector can be added or you can directly solder if you are at all handy.
 

large_ghostman

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If it is a standard blade width (like an outlet) you can plug a 5V cell phone charger or 12V adapter into it and find a little sonalert(r) or other low voltage buzzer. The low voltage buzzers are generally much quieter than this old appliance buzzers.

The barrel connector on the low voltage AC to DC adapters can be cut and another type of connector can be added or you can directly solder if you are at all handy.
Well beats my next idea of drilling a hole in the floor to see the light! Got to be a thumbs up idea
 
If it is a standard blade width (like an outlet) you can plug a 5V cell phone charger or 12V adapter into it and find a little sonalert(r) or other low voltage buzzer. The low voltage buzzers are generally much quieter than this old appliance buzzers.

The barrel connector on the low voltage AC to DC adapters can be cut and another type of connector can be added or you can directly solder if you are at all handy.
The connection is loose wires so this is a viable option. Thanks!
 

Reloadron

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I would run with Gopher's thinking in post #4. Rather than a harsh buzz a more soothing tone would be nice. It's funny how our dogs react to different everyday sounds in the house. Mallory Sonoalert devices come to mind but devices like this are made by countless manufacturers with voltages ranging from low voltage DC to 120 VAC (for US & Canada applications). Distributors like McMaster Carr Supply also have assorted audible signaling devices and even Amazon has them.

Ron
 

gophert

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He could drive everyone crazy by connecting a doorbell transformer to the dryer and a standard doorbell. The power supplied to the doorbell will make it ding when the power starts, hum for a few seconds and then dong when power is released.
 

AnalogKid

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It is not clear if the buzzer module is intermittent, or if it gets an intermittent signal from the dryer. Can you put a meter on the terminals and report if the module is getting a continuous 120 Vac when operating?

The blades are almost certainly 0.187" or 0.250" "Faston" or quick-disconnect terminals. These are not compatible with a standard 110 Vac plug, as they are designed for a 0.025" or 0.031" thick blade. Still, no reason they can't be cut off and wired directly to a standard AC socket.

Using a wall wart as an isolated signal converter has solved many similar problems.

ak
 

alec_t

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Do you have a kitchen timer you could simply set to alert you when you expect the drying cycle to end?
 
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