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why solar system use both battery as well as inverter ?

jab99407

Member
I have seen in the solar power system panel that the system may have both a battery and an inverter.

I do not understand why they do not use only batteries or inverter why they use both inverter and battery

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Externet

Active Member
Hi.
The items on the right column prefer to work with alternating current. That is provided by an inverter. The items at the right column may need to operate at night, possible when panels are not productive but their daylight production was stored in the batteries.
 

jab99407

Member
Hi.
The items on the right column prefer to work with alternating current. That is provided by an inverter. The items at the right column may need to operate at night, possible when panels are not productive but their daylight production was stored in the batteries.

I think they should either use only the inverter or you should use the battery, both device store power that supplies to home devices. that's why I am confused,
 

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
I think they should either use only the inverter or you should use the battery, both device store power that supplies to home devices. that's why I am confused,
As already explained, the battery stores the energy from the solar, making it MUCH more useful - and the inverter converts it to mains AC to run normal household equipment.

If you convert all the household equipment to run off the correct DC voltage, and rewire the entire house specially for that, then you wouldn't need the inverter.
 

alec_t

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
both device store power
No. Only the battery stores power (or more correctly energy). The inverter converts the panel DC voltage or the battery DC voltage to an AC voltage for AC loads (most mains-powered devices).
 

jab99407

Member
No. Only the battery stores power (or more correctly energy). The inverter converts the panel DC voltage or the battery DC voltage to an AC voltage for AC loads (most mains-powered devices).
I have a question The voltage coming out of the solar array is AC or DC. I assume there will be an AC voltage
 

gophert

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
AC is created by rotary movement - there's nothing that moves in a solar panel, so as Diver300 said, it's output is DC.
nothing moves in an inverter but it outputs AC - lack of movement is not a criteria for DC.
 

audioguru

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Why do you need solar, a battery and an inverter anyway? Do you live far from civilization?
 

KeepItSimpleStupid

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
My $0.02

The simplest system is s grid tie inverter. Biggest disadvantage: When the power goes out, the power goes out.
Advantage: No batteries. Payback: Depends on utility. Your excess power may be generated at the wholesale rate. So, only if your consuming while you have output you get a big advantage. if you work during the day, it messes tings up.

if your billed using peak energy methods you could save some money.

There are some complex systems that integrate, utility, generator, wind and solar with batteries all at the same time Batteries are a big problem, but with no utility power, you get power.

The solar panels can be one big array or a bunch of micro-inverters. They get shaded and that presents a problem. They get dirty s the output is decreased. They have to be replaced every once in a while. 25 yrs+.

Batteries are expensive.

While we are on the topic, there are natural gas generators that might be whole house or critical loads.

With a grid tie inverter, you'd not want to put power on the grid. A lineman could get electrocuted. the grid-tie inverter takes care of that.

With the other systems you need a transfer switch. they are emchanically interlocked, so it's NOT POSSIB:E for Utility and auxillary power to be connected at the same time.

Generators require exercise and they do drop out for a little bit. Generally they can be set not to when they get exercised/

Wind power is goofy because you have to take it when you get it.

I know that large grid solar plants, e.g. 4 MW can do local utility power factor correction because of the inverter technology.

Arrays can be fixed or have automatic sun tracking.

I worked I basic research where nothing was manufacturable and I did some work putting together a demand side management research project that was published.

Microinverters may be new to everybody: https://enphase.com/en-us/products-and-services/microinverters
 

Reloadron

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Solar panels do not make power in the dark. Solar panels are rated for peak power under direct sunlight not shade. So while solar panels can provide power and charge batteries under the right conditions they can not store energy which is why we have batteries in the loop. If I want house lights after dark batteries are my new best friend. :)

Ron
 

Reloadron

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
My best friend is a bottle of Johnny Walker Black but a power line powered outlet is a close second - but don't tell my wife!
That too but I can feel my way to my Scotch. :)

Ron
 

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