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Well anyway......

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tvtech

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Some of you know me. Some of you don't.
Remember my little LED light?................

lol............still going strong. 2 PP3 used now. Leds....still 100%

Built 3, all good for another i dont know how many years.
My original one that went to hell and back still working. Just sits and works come whatever.

Leds die......not on this baby.
24hrs a day for....lets see....4 years......not shabby.

Little Duris E3 LED's mounted and cooled properly.

:)
 
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JonSea

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LEDs typically have a lifetime of 50,000 hrs, which is almost 6 years when operated 24 hours a day. But "lifetime" is defined as dimming to 50% of original brightness, so they could still be working many years after that.
 

Western

Member
When I first started seeing leds I thought they were going to last forever ... and I don't recall changing any in the first 20 years or more ... but now I see them crook quite regularly.

One thing that surprised me is that they don't like direct sunlight. Eg. In a rotary dairy where the platform stops for several hours in one spot ... those exposed to sunlight get horribly faded ... but other's that don't get much sun ... still look really good.

I'd also suggest that sunlight bothers them more if they are illuminated ... more so than if they are not. That comes from recent experience with a roadside led sign.
 

gophert

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When I first started seeing leds I thought they were going to last forever ... and I don't recall changing any in the first 20 years or more ... but now I see them crook quite regularly.

One thing that surprised me is that they don't like direct sunlight. Eg. In a rotary dairy where the platform stops for several hours in one spot ... those exposed to sunlight get horribly faded ... but other's that don't get much sun ... still look really good.

I'd also suggest that sunlight bothers them more if they are illuminated ... more so than if they are not. That comes from recent experience with a roadside led sign.
The UV damage is mostly UV damage to the polymer - hazing, microcracks and other optical effects causing oxidation and depolymerization which, in turn, cause reflection and absorption instead of transmission.
 
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